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Volume 20 No. 42
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NFL Network’s ‘Good morning football’ set for new digs

NFL Network’s hit morning show, “Good Morning Football,” is moving out of CBS’s Manhattan production facility by the beginning of April.

 

Network executives told the show’s crew last week about its plans.

 

As part of its “Thursday Night Football” agreement, CBS hosted the show in its CBS Broadcast Center since its August 2016 launch. Fox outbid CBS to pick up “Thursday Night Football” rights starting this fall, which means that the network no longer is contractually obligated to host the show.

 

But an NFL Network executive said the move was planned well before CBS lost the rights to Thursday night.

 

“I’ve known since Christmas that I wanted to move the show, whether CBS got ‘Thursday Night Football’ or not,” said Mark Quenzel, a senior vice president at NFL Media. “This has nothing at all to do with ‘Thursday Night Football.’”

 

“Good Morning Football” will move 12 blocks south and be part of the NFL Experience in Times Square. NFL Network is considering having a live audience during the show, though it won’t have one at the start.

 

“Our set will look out on the entire panorama of Times Square — it’s an amazing view,” Quenzel said. “All the energy in the background just reeks of New York.”

 

NFL Experience launched in December through a partnership between the NFL and Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group. Quenzel said that when the show launches, it will be a 15-hour-per-week marketing platform for the Experience.

 

“Good Morning Football,” which is produced by Embassy Row, has been a breakout hit for NFL Network. The show’s main hosts — Kay Adams, Kyle Brandt, Nate Burleson and Peter Schrager — talk football in an entertaining way, rarely cover entertainment and don’t wade into politics. The show will retain the same format in its new digs.

 

The show was NFL Network’s first to originate from New York and outrated the network’s previous shows, like “NFL AM,” which was produced in Los Angeles.

— John Ourand