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Volume 7 No. 90
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Int'l Cricket Council Alerted To Match-Fixing Concerns By Three Captains

Three int'l cricket captains "have been approached by fixers in the past six weeks" and the Int'l Cricket Council is "currently investigating seven live cases as the battle against corruption shows no sign of slowing down," according to Nick Hoult of the London TELEGRAPH. It highlights the "challenge facing Alex Marshall," the new GM of the ICC’s anti-corruption unit, who joined in September having previously been the chief constable of Hampshire. Zimbabwe captain Graeme Cremer "reported a suspicious approach before a Test match against West Indies earlier this month." Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed "also alerted the anti-corruption unit of an illegal approach from a potential fixer" before a one-day series in Sri Lanka. The "third captain is not known." It is understood "all three reported the approaches to the ICC’s anti-corruption unit within an hour" (TELEGRAPH, 12/5). In London, Ali Martin reported the fact "such high-profile names are being approached is alarming" -- although their response "is viewed as evidence" the education programs are working. Of "huge concern to the ACU is the proliferation of privately-owned micro-tournaments" in the subcontinent and the Middle East, which feature local players and the "odd" recently retired "star" and are seen as a "possible entry-point for would-be corrupters into higher level scams." The money on offer "is understood to range" from $5,000-$150,000, with the ICC "having become increasingly aware" that both women’s cricket and the U17 and U19 levels "are becoming areas of interest to match-fixers" (GUARDIAN, 12/5).

COMMON OCCURRENCE?: In London, Aaron Rogan reported about 15% of EU athletes "have been asked to fix a match in the past year." A survey conducted by the University of Limerick of more than 600 athletes across six EU countries showed that 40% "believed that club officials were the most likely to instigate match-fixing." Of the 15% who said that they were approached to fix a match in the past year, 36% said they "would not report it due to a lack of trust and confidentiality" (LONDON TIMES, 12/5).