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Volume 27 No. 28
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Temperature Checks Not Required For Fans Attending NLCS, World Series

Fans who attend the NLCS and World Series at Globe Life Field "will not be subjected to a temperature check," according to Bill Shaikin of the L.A. TIMES. In its health and safety protocols, MLB "requires temperature checks for players, coaches, team staffers, media members and stadium cleaning crews." When the Rangers yesterday put tickets on public sale for the NLCS and World Series, they noted that fans "could buy in groups of only four, would be seated at least six feet from other groups, and would have to wear masks when not eating or drinking." The Rangers "limited sales to 11,500 tickets per game" -- the new ballpark seats 40,300. The Rangers said public health authorities "recommend self-screening before you enter public places." MLB said that fans "exhibiting symptoms could be denied entry." The league in a statement said regarding the lack of temperature checks, "This decision was based on a number of factors, including the reliability of available technology and the close contact that temperature checks would require" (L.A. TIMES, 10/7).

WHEN FANS RETURN: THE ATHLETIC's Evan Drellich noted the NLCS and World Series will mark the first time MLB will "allow fans to attend games" since the COVID-19 pandemic began, with the league selling NLCS tickets from $40-250 and World Series tickets from $75-450. Once inside the ballpark, merchandise and concession stands "will be open and fans can move freely about the concourse, with the expectation they maintain proper distancing." Fans who go to games "will not be required to sign a separate waiver regarding COVID-19, but there is a waiver included in the ticket agreement that directly addresses COVID-19" (THEATHLETIC.com, 10/6).

NOTHING FAMILIAR ABOUT THIS: The Yankees-Rays ALDS is being played at the Padres' Petco Park, and in Tampa, Marc Topkin writes the whole situation is "weird." After playing the Wild Card round at higher-seeded teams' ballparks, MLB "implemented a modified version of the bubble concept used by other sports." The Rays and Yankees are sharing the same hotel, and despite "COVID-19 distancing rules, increased on-site security and strategic planning in room assignments, separate entrances and staggered arrival and departure times, the Rays and Yankees are crossing paths" (TAMPA BAY TIMES, 10/7). In San Diego, Bryce Miller writes describing the situation as strange is "succint and spot-on." The COVID-19 pandemic "tossed baseball's march through October into a blender." Miller: "Strange things always happen in the playoffs. This time, far more than we ever thought possible" (SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, 10/7). Also in San Diego, Annie Heilbrunn goes with, "Padres' Wives, Girlfriends Ready To Take On Texas In Postseason Bubble" (SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, 10/7).