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Volume 26 No. 225
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Many NFL Players To Wait Until Last Minute To Report To Camp

It "probably would make sense" for NFL players to arrive to their team cities up to two weeks ahead to quarantine and make sure they will be ready to go for the start of camp, but that "likely won't be the case," according to Ben Volin of the BOSTON GLOBE. One agent with more than a dozen players said that his clients "are not arriving to their teams until they absolutely have to." Volin noted that thinking "may lead to more positive tests, but players don’t want to give up their workout routines." The agent said, "We're still waiting for the official word on when camp is actually starting. And most (players) are not coming early just because they want to make sure they have facilities to work out in all the way up until the team facilities open up for players" (BOSTON GLOBE, 7/12). In Boston, Tara Sullivan wrote NFL training camps are only 2 1/2 weeks away, and the league "hasn't wavered in its certainty of a season, and maybe it's right." Sullivan: "I don't see it, but here's one certainty I do see: It's not going to happen without a fight. Pretending otherwise is hubris wrapped in folly" (BOSTON GLOBE, 7/12).

TOUGH CALL: ESPN's Adam Schefter said it is “hard to imagine” training camp starting on time in late July with virus cases rising. Schefter: “Look at where all the hotspots are right now: California, Texas and Florida, where there are an abundance of NFL teams. You’re going to be opening camps at a time when these cases are rising by the day and they are recording record numbers? They’re going to try to do it” (“Get Up,” ESPN, 7/14). ESPN Radio’s Mike Golic said the most important thing for the NFL to get to training camp is “testing, how much you’re going to test and who you’re going to test.” Golic: “I’m using the preseason games as my negotiating chip. I’ll play those. I don’t care about those. I’ll play them. I’ll give that up to get something back" (“Golic & Wingo,” ESPN Radio, 7/14).

TALKING A BIG GAME: In Boston, Greg Bedard wrote the "bark from the NFL players and their union is always worse than their bite." They always talk a "great game when it comes to CBA negotiations and items like commissioner power, but they hardly ever do anything." Bedard: "I'm all for the players in mist circumstances, but especially this one. And if they can't grow a collective backbone and demand what's in the best interest of their players and their families, then the group is hopeless and will always be pushed around by the owners" (BOSTONSPORTSJOURNAL.com, 7/12).