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Volume 26 No. 109
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Sydney McLaughlin Growing Brand Awareness Ahead Of Tokyo Games

McLaughlin will soon have her own sneaker and apparel line with New Balance
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
McLaughlin will soon have her own sneaker and apparel line with New Balance
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
McLaughlin will soon have her own sneaker and apparel line with New Balance
Photo: GETTY IMAGES

U.S. hurdler Sydney McLaughlin wants to use the '20 Tokyo Games as a "launching pad for a career that will put her on the short list of American athletes who command our full attention even when they aren't competing for championships," according to Steve Politi of the Newark STAR-LEDGER. McLaughlin, who is CEO of her own company, Syd Inc., has "one agent who sets her track schedule, another who lines up her endorsements, and still another who handles her media requests." New Balance "won a bidding war last fall to help make her one of the world's highest-paid runners" with an annual income estimated at more than $1.5M. Meanwhile, WME "recruited her as just the second track-and-field athlete under its giant umbrella." McLaughlin's partners "believe the combination of her world-class talent, jaw-dropping looks and natural ability to connect with her 400,000 followers on social media make her the kind of star that nearby Hollywood loves." There will soon be a "sneaker and apparel line" with New Balance that "has McLaughlin's personal stamp: A butterfly." WME continues "searching for brands that are the right fit now." WME "leaves nothing off the table -- fashion, makeup, even a content strategy that rivals what some of today's NBA stars have." Opportunities like this "might be years away for Syd Inc," but WME is "already thinking that far down the road" (Newark STAR-LEDGER, 8/21).

TESTING, 1-2-3: The AP's Pells & Graham cite sources as saying U.S. sprinter Christian Coleman's Olympic prospects "might be in jeopardy after three missed drug tests" over the past over 12 months, which "can be treated as a positive test and doping violation." Athletes are "required to provide authorities with their whereabouts so they can be tested for drugs without notice." Failing to provide that information, or "not being present when a tester shows up, is considered a violation." The track world is "looking for someone to fill the massive vacuum" Usain Bolt left when he retired in '17. Coleman, the reigning U.S. 100M dash champion, signed a seven-figure deal with Nike when he "turned pro" in '17 (AP, 8/22).