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Volume 24 No. 114

Olympics

     Coca-Cola has unveiled plans for its $20M Olympic City
interactive marketing theme park located on eight acres adjacent
to the Centennial Olympic Park.  The company envisions the park,
based on Coke's "Touchdown Town" parks at the last two Super
Bowls, to be the "town central" for the '96 Games.  Visitors will
be charged admission to enter the area, but officials say that is
as much for crowd control as profit motives, as the fees are not
expected to cover project costs.  Coca-Cola Marketing VP Stu
Cross: "We don't want people waiting an hour to go through the
gymnastics exhibit.  We don't want them eight deep in line."  The
park will be designed to give visitors "hands-on experiences"
with such exhibits as shooting baskets against a "virtual" Dream
Team or running against Florence Griffith-Joyner (Melissa Turner,
ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, 4/27).

     Avon Products has announced details of its sponsorship of
the '96 Games, including its role as presenting sponsor of "The
Olympic Woman" exhibition.  Avon will be the official cosmetics,
skin care and fragrance sponsor of the '96 Games and the USOC.
"The Olympic Woman," an exhibition of the Olympic Arts Festival,
which opens June 23 and runs throughout the Games, will be a
multi-media exhibition chronicling the history women's
participation in the Olympic Games since 1896.  This is Avon's
first foray into sports marketing since '82.  From '77-82, Avon
sponsored a series of int'l women's marathons (Avon).  According
to Victor Beaudet at Avon, the bulk of the sponsorship will be
paid for in cash, possibly from product royalties.  Beaudet also
said their sponsorship is not a Top Worldwide sponsorship, such
as la Coca-Cola, Kodak, IBM, etc. (THE DAILY).

     In the final TV rights-fee deal for the '96 Games, Japan's
NHK television network has agreed to a pay $99.5M for that
country's rights.  ACOG is expecting a total of $555.5M in rights
fees, with the U.S., European and Japanese rights making up $484M
of that figure.  NHK paid $62M to broadcast the '92 Games
(AP/ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, 4/27).