SBD Global/June 25, 2014/World Cup

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  • German Sportswear Brand Adidas Says World Cup To Push Sales To €2B Billion Target

    Adidas' official match ball, the Brazuca, has helped sales.

    German sportswear firm Adidas expects to meet its target for 2 billion euros ($2.7 billion) of soccer sales this year as the World Cup fires demand for its shirts, boots and balls, it said on Tuesday.

    "I can confirm that we will reach the 2 billion euros for the first time in the history of our company," Adidas Chief Executive Herbert Hainer told a news conference.

    Adidas, which has long dominated the market for soccer gear, is facing a challenge from Nike, the world's biggest  ..

    German sportswear firm Adidas expects to meet its target for 2 billion euros ($2.7 billion) of soccer sales this year as the World Cup fires demand for its shirts, boots and balls, it said on Tuesday.

    "I can confirm that we will reach the 2 billion euros for the first time in the history of our company," Adidas Chief Executive Herbert Hainer told a news conference.

    Adidas, which has long dominated the market for soccer gear, is facing a challenge from Nike, the world's biggest  ..

    German sportswear firm adidas said that it expects to meet its target for €2B ($2.7B) of football sales this year "as the World Cup fires demand for its shirts, boots and balls," according to Emma Thompson of REUTERS. Adidas CEO Herbert Hainer said, "I can confirm that we will reach the 2 billion euros for the first time in the history of our company." Adidas "is facing a challenge from Nike." While adidas "has supplied the match ball for the World Cup since 1970 and has extended its sponsorship of the competition to 2030, Nike is for the first time kitting out more teams" -- 10 out of 32 finalists -- including hosts and favorites Brazil. Adidas said that "it expected to sell more than 8 million jerseys of the nine national sides it is sponsoring at the World Cup." It also expected to sell more than 14 million replicas of the "Brazuca" official World Cup match ball, a million more than the ball it produced for the '10 competition (REUTERS, 6/24). BLOOMBERG's Jarvis & Ricadela wrote adidas will sell "a third more Germany jerseys" than in '06 when the country hosted the World Cup. Adidas spokesperson Katja Schreiber said, "For the last couple of years, the German team is playing really exciting football." She added that it is reflected in the sales and in more interest from the int'l market. More than 500,000 Germany jerseys will be sold outside of Europe this year (BLOOMBERG, 6/24). In London, John Drayton wrote that to celebrate Lionel Messi's 27th birthday, adidas has made a special pair of boots for the Argentinian players to wear in the match with Nigeria on Wednesday. The new footwear are "a technicolor version" of the adizeroTM f50 Messi boots he is currently wearing (DAILY MAIL, 6/24).

    Print | Tags: International Football, Brazil
  • HBO's 'Real Sports' Program Examines Match-Fixing Of Professional Football Matches

    The issue of match-fixing of professional football games around the world was examined on HBO's "Real Sports" Tuesday night, with HBO's Bryant Gumbel noting "authorities in Europe recently announced that nearly 400 professional soccer games across the continent are suspected of being fixed." Gumbel said "investigators" looking for those that are fixing the games "are looking east, to Asia." An unidentified match fixer said, "Footballers are the easiest people to corrupt. They like to drink, they like to womanize and they like to gamble so they need money." A former match-fixer, Ante Sapina, said when asked if most players he approached to fix a game would agree, "Most would say yes." INTERPOL Secretary General Ron Noble said exposing match-fixing is as "important to us as organized crime and a variety of other areas." Gumbel noted the money involved in these fixes "is huge." Gumbel: "According to authorities, it's into the billions each year." Noble called it a "low-risk, high-return endeavor" and the chances of "getting caught and prosecuted if you're engaged in match-fixing around the world is really low." Gumbel said, "In recent years, INTERPOL has started to gather some evidence. Authorities have been monitoring the flow of cash from Asian syndicates to European players." Former FIFA Head of Security Chris Eaton noted, "Half the countries in the world in some way have experienced a match-fixing in football." Eaton said he had "no idea when I came to FIFA this was a problem." Eaton: "My recognition of the problem evolved over time. By the time I left FIFA I had realized the enormity of the problem FIFA was facing, but not just FIFA, every sport." Noble added, "You have to be really, really, really naïve to think it isn’t happening in the U.S. or it won't happen in the U.S." Gumbel noted "while the authorities are fighting a losing battle, they have had some small victories." But he added, "But with so much money being offered to so many players, officials are ultimately trying to fight human nature and in that contest it seems the fix is in" ("Real Sports," HBO, 6/24).

    Print | Tags: International Football, North America
  • Spanish National Team's Elimination Projected To Cost Spain Bars Up To $265M

    The Spanish Hospitality & Catering Federation (FEHR) estimated that on July 1, 2012, when Spain beat Italy in the finals to win Euro 2012, bars and restaurants "earned 40% more than their average earnings for a Sunday," according to EL CONFIDENCIAL. That "situation will not be repeated this year." Calculations by Kelisto.es project that Spain's elimination from the World Cup "will cause bars to lose" approximately €195M ($265M) in revenue, while other businesses will lose at least €404M ($550M). The study, carried out in collaboration with Universidad Pablo de Olavide's economy department, compares "monthly sales from normal situations with those produced during the 2010 World Cup." It was calculated by this study that sales throughout the tournament would have reached €986M ($1.3B) had Spain made the finals of the current World Cup. The FEHR did not "confirm this figure, but it did admit that an event like the World Cup makes for an increase in earnings that is undeniable for bars and restaurants." Spain's bar and restaurant sector was "expecting to contribute" €259M ($352M) to the national economy, but "only a small part of this sum has been contributed from business during the group phase" (EL CONFIDENCIAL, 6/24).

    Print | Tags: International Football, Europe
  • World Cup Notes: Online Petition Draws 20,000 Signatures To Remove NZ Referee

    An online petition "has already drawn 20,000 signatures to remove New Zealand referee Peter O'Leary from the World Cup after an image appeared of him 'celebrating' with Nigeria goalkeeper Vincent Enyeama." In the aftermath of the game, Man City striker Dzeko said O'Leary's performance was "shameful" (NZ HERALD, 6/24). ... FIFA TV, which provides live World Cup images for the global TV audience, "displayed the wrong graphic which indicated Brazil's third goal in their 4-1 win over Cameroon was offside." Striker Fred "headed home after 49 minutes but millions of viewers thought the assistant referee had made the wrong call because during the replay FIFA TV showed the offside line from the position of a Cameroon player and not the Brazil striker" (REUTERS, 6/24).

    Print | Tags: International Football
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