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SBD Global/June 24, 2014/Events and Attractions

Wimbledon Tightens Up Clothing Policy, Vows To Strictly Enforce 'Almost Entirely White' Rule

Roger Federer's orange-soled shoes were scrutinized at last year's tournament.
Wimbledon's style police have "tightened up their clothing policy, with any offenders being warned that they will be sent to the referee's office," where a "supply of suitable clothing" awaits, according to Sanderson & Sheridan of the LONDON TIMES. The tournament referee, Andrew Jarrett, has told all the players and their clothing suppliers that the All England Club's interpretation of its "almost entirely white" rule will be "tougher than last year." So there will be "no repeat of Roger Federer's orange-soled trainers from last year, or Tatiana Golovin's fetching red knickers from a few years ago, nor John McEnroe's colourful sweat bands." Players will be allowed to have a "1cm coloured trim" around the neckline and cuff of their shirts, with the "same trim width being allowed down the outside seam of shorts, skirts and tracksuit bottoms." The same will apply for "caps, headbands, wristbands and socks." While female players have been "allowed a certain latitude with their undergarments, the screws are being tightened this year." Again, "only a single, 1cm of coloured trim will be permitted." Jarrett has said to players of both sexes, "Undergarments that either are or can be visible during play, including due to perspiration, must also be completely white and contain no more than 1cm of colored trim" (LONDON TIMES, 6/23). REUTERS' Michael Roddy wrote tickets for this year's Wimbledon are "even more in demand than usual." Stuart Bere, a gardener from Lincolnshire, England, was first in "The Queue" for tickets on Monday, "ensuring he would get to see" last year's men's singles champion and local favourite, Andy Murray, play on the tournament's opening day. "The Queue," a tradition "dating back" to the '20s, allows people who "haven't been able to buy tickets through a lottery-like ballot, or as part of the Wimbledon debenture scheme, to line up at the All England Club in south London for a ticket." Henry O'Grady of the Wimbledon press department said that by just after 8am on Sunday, The Queue was full. Some 500 people were "lucky enough to get one-day tickets" for Centre Court on Monday, where Murray "successfully began his title defence by winning in straight sets against Belgian David Goffin" (REUTERS, 6/23).
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