Group Created with Sketch.
Volume 26 No. 178
  • Created with Sketch.
  • Created with Sketch.
  • Created with Sketch.

BodyArmor Exits NCAA Deal After Just One Year

BodyArmor partnered with the NCAA last year after Coke invested heavily in the sports drink
Photo: BODYARMOR
BodyArmor partnered with the NCAA last year after Coke invested heavily in the sports drink
Photo: BODYARMOR
BodyArmor partnered with the NCAA last year after Coke invested heavily in the sports drink
Photo: BODYARMOR

BodyArmor will exit its NCAA deal after only one year, and Powerade will reclaim its courtside spot for March Madness in '20. Technically, those sideline rights belong to Coca-Cola, a longtime NCAA corporate champion. When Coca-Cola acquired a minority stake in up-and-coming BodyArmor last year, the NCAA seemed like a natural battleground from which to challenge Gatorade. A key reason for the switch back to Powerade is the marketing strategy for BodyArmor, which has gone in a different direction with a large stable of pro athletes endorsing the brand. BodyArmor officials said their NCAA sponsorship was a one-year deal -- subleased from Coke -- and the brand chose not to renew because the money could be spent more effectively elsewhere. The next thing to watch: Will Powerade's Active Water, a new product introduced in July, be activated anywhere at NCAA championships? Coca-Cola currently markets its Dasani water brand during those events.