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Volume 26 No. 178
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Kyrgios' "Just Do You" Nike Shirt Creates Controversy At U.S. Open

Tennis player Nick Kyrgios staged a protest before his second-round match against Antoine Hoang in the U.S. Open after being "taken to task" for wearing a Nike shirt that "displayed the following words in bold underneath the collar: 'Just do you,'" according to Scott Spits of the Melbourne AGE. In what was "seemingly a dress-code breach" on Thursday, a tournament official "instructed Kyrgios to change after the warm-up." But Kyrgios was "initially having none of it, demanding to see the rule book." He said, "I’m not going to play until you show me the rule." It was "later determined to be a simple misunderstanding." Kyrgios said, "They must have read it wrong. I think they thought it said ‘Just Do It’, like the [Nike] slogan. It was actually ‘Just Do You’. I think it was a mix-up. It’s all cleared up now. I can wear that. I can wear the collar up" (Melbourne AGE, 8/30).

BAD BOY ATTITUDE: THE AUSTRALIAN's Courtney Walsh notes Kyrgios is now the subject of two separate ATP investigations "into poor behaviour." The first is a "probe into the tantrum he threw" at the Cincinnati Masters, while the second is "considering the defamatory accusation" he made against the ATP. The ATP has appointed Gayle Bradshaw to investigate whether Kyrgios "deserves a 'major offence' sanction for describing the ruling body as 'pretty corrupt' in a press conference" after his first-round match at the U.S. Open. Soon after the ATP announced the investigation, Kyrgios issued a statement "conceding he had chosen the wrong word to describe his frustration with the tour." But he "maintained a stance that double standards are applied to him compared with peers." It is "possible either investigation would be enough to lead to a ban given his disciplinary record." An adverse finding in both "would allow the tour to institute a clause dealing with repeated misconduct" (AUSTRALIAN, 8/30).

MUST-SEE TV: In N.Y., Christopher Clarey wrote no player outside of Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer "generates as much buzz" as Kyrgios. It could be argued that "no man, not even one of the Big Three, generates as much interest from the younger fans tennis desperately needs to reach if it is to remain a part of everyone’s screen time." Kyrgios "regularly attacks the game at which he intermittently excels." Tennis "needs contrasts in personalities." But Kyrgios is also a "serial rule breaker, and his on-court behavior often disrespects not just players, officials and his own courtside entourage, but also the sport itself" (N.Y. TIMES, 8/29). The GLOBE & MAIL's Cathal Kelly writes Kyrgios has been "edging his way into forced retirement for some time now." It "makes for wonderful viewing." Clearly, he "enjoys the push-pull of breaking the rules and then being punished for it." There is a "wide streak of sadomasochism in him" (GLOBE & MAIL, 8/30).