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Volume 7 No. 149
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GambleAware To Launch 'Bet Regret' During ManU-Liverpool

GambleAware announced the launch of its latest gambling-harm awareness campaign, "Bet Regret," according to Ted Menmuir of SBC NEWS. The campaign aims to "raise public awareness of betting triggers" and impulsive behaviors. It will be launched during Sky Sports’ broadcast of ManU vs. Liverpool on Sunday, which is expected to generate the highest TV audience of the '18-19 EPL season. Bet Regret is the first GambleAware campaign developed under the guidance of London agency M&C Saatchi (SBC NEWS, 2/21). THE DRUM's John Glenday reported the promotional push "seeks to reach young men considered to be at greatest risk of developing a gambling addiction" by fostering "greater self-reflection on the feelings of regret that arise from impulsive betting while drunk, bored or chasing losses." One spot depicts a "furtive gambler slinking off to the kitchen to place a sly bet on his phone away from the prying eyes of his partner," only to find himself teleported to League Championship side Queens Park Rangers' Loftus Road Stadium, where he is questioned by BT Sport’s Matt Smith and former Welsh players Dean Saunders and Danny Gabbidon. M&C Saatchi Chief Creative Officer Justin Tindall said, "We’ve all done it. Placed a bet that seems like a good idea at the time -- usually when you’ve had one too many, have got time to kill or are chasing a losing streak" (THE DRUM, 2/21). The BBC's Alistair Magowan reported GambleAware's campaign will be "drowned out" by betting adverts during EPL games, campaigners say. The Campaign For Fairer Gambling said, "Safer gambling campaigns are not as effective as reducing gambling ads." Trustee Professor Sian Griffiths said that the "Bet Regret" adverts were part of a wider Safer Gambling Campaign, commissioned by the government, to "moderate gambling for sports bettors." Griffiths said, "A lot of this is based on what bettors have told us." When asked if it was "counter-intuitive to have betting adverts alongside those warning against betting," she added, "You have to allow people choice, and betting adverts aren't necessarily aimed at people with a gambling problem, they are aimed at the general public" (BBC, 2/21).