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Volume 7 No. 149

Leagues and Governing Bodies

Cricket Australia is "embroiled in another dispute" with a member of the cricket family after the appointment of a new chair "met strident opposition from his home state," according to Andrew Wu of THE AGE. The governing body announced on Wednesday that interim Chair Earl Eddings was appointed to the position permanently "but the move has upset Victoria." The Cricket Victoria board issued a statement just minutes after CA's announcement which "refused to endorse Eddings." Victoria's public opposition "caught other states by surprise," with "some shocked" that it "would be so forthright over what is effectively a job title." Queensland publicly endorsed Eddings' appointment, saying that it "allowed the focus to return to on-field action," while the Australian Cricketers' Association "gave guarded approval." CA believes that Eddings' title is important at the Int'l Cricket Council "as it will give him authority" to speak for the organization. Victoria's resistance to the move of Eddings to permanent chair, revealed last week, comes at a time when CA is "working to repair relationships with key stakeholders in the game" (THE AGE, 11/28). ABC NEWS reported Eddings had served as CA's interim chair since replacing David Peever, who was "forced to resign" at the beginning of November. CV Chair Paul Barker said that Eddings' position should not have been made permanent "until all CA board positions were filled." He said, "Cricket Victoria has made its view clear and our preference remains that the interim chairman arrangements were maintained while Australian cricket undertakes a thorough process to fill the recent board vacancies." Eddings' initial tenure will last for less than a year, as he will be up for re-election at CA's 2019 annual general meeting (ABC NEWS, 11/28). The BBC reported CA Dir Jacquie Hey said that it had been a "challenging" year for the organization. She said, "Our aim is to ensure management are empowered to rebuild trust and strengthen the game. Earl's involvement over the past decade provides continuity in a time of change and enables the board to maintain strong relations with the International Cricket Council, other member countries and our valued partners" (BBC, 11/28).

More than 100 applicants from around the world have "sought to join a new all-female motor racing series" aimed at getting them into Formula 1, where no woman has competed since '76, according to Alan Baldwin of REUTERS. Organizers on Wednesday issued a long list of 55 for the W Series, which is set to launch in May with 18 drivers racing 1.8-liter Formula 3 cars for a $1.5M prize fund. Spainish former Lotus and Renault F1 development driver Carmen Jordá, a 30-year-old who also sits on FIA's women's commission, "was one of those to go on to the next phase." Amna al-Qubaisi, 18, the first female racing driver from the UAE to compete in Italian Formula 4 and who will test a Formula E car in Saudi Arabia next month, was another. The first race is scheduled for Hockenheim, Germany, on May 3 (REUTERS, 11/28).

LEADING THE WAY: The BBC's Andrew Benson reported former F1 driver Alexander Wurz will lead the assessment program the W Series will use to select competitors. Grand Prix Drivers' Association Chair Wurz said that there is "no reason women could not compete with men on an equal basis." He said, "We know there is no difference in capability between male and female drivers. ... That we don't have enough female drivers in racing is just a mirror of society because families don't take enough girls to the kart track" (BBC, 11/28).

Sergio Pรฉrez (right) was the only driver outside of Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull to reach a podium.
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Sergio Pรฉrez (right) was the only driver outside of Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull to reach a podium.
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Sergio Pรฉrez (right) was the only driver outside of Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull to reach a podium.
Photo: GETTY IMAGES

The "top three teams' domination" of Formula 1 over the past two seasons "is unacceptable and has to change," F1 Managing Dir Ross Brawn said. Force India's Sergio Pérez was the only driver outside Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull to finish a grand prix in the top three in this year's 21 races. Brawn: "Two podiums from a total of 123 is unacceptable. ... It's a problem we are tackling together with the FIA and the teams, because the future of Formula 1 depends on it (REUTERS, 11/28).

A WADA delegation held talks with Russian officials and visited a suspended Moscow anti-doping laboratory on Wednesday "as it waits for Russia to meet a year-end deadline to hand over laboratory data." Wednesday's visit, which included three WADA delegates, was "meant to lay the groundwork for a subsequent mission -- on a date not yet announced -- to retrieve the data" (REUTERS, 11/28).

The global esports sector is "continuing its advance," with confirmation that Singapore will boast its own esports association "in support of professional gamers." Led by Ng Chong Geng, the national sports association "will seek to present Singapore as a hub for events and players" in Southeast Asia (THE DRUM, 11/28).

The Int'l Cricket Council "has pinned its hopes on South Asian migrants" in Germany and the U.S. to "expand the game's footprint in the untapped markets of Europe and Americas." ICC GM, Commercial Campbell Jamieson said that the game is "growing rapidly" in Germany. The sport is also "growing fast" in the U.S., something that was acknowledged by former West Indies int'l Ricardo Powell, who is now a selector for the U.S. national team (PTI, 11/28).

National Rugby League coaches met on Wednesday to discuss the "possible introduction of a transfer window" as a "frantic few weeks of activity shifts from the frontrow to the playmakers and the plans of four clubs" -- Cronulla, St. George Illawarra, Parramatta and the New Zealand Warriors (THE AUSTRALIAN, 11/28).