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Volume 6 No. 264
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Chelsea's £1B Stamford Bridge Plan Moves One Step Closer As Injunction Is Rejected

Chelsea's £1B ($1.4B) redevelopment of Stamford Bridge "has moved a step closer" after Hammersmith & Fulham Council passed a motion that will "prevent an injunction blocking the plans," according to Simon Stone of the BBC. The injunction was taken out by a neighboring family, the Crosthwaites, "who argue the stadium's expansion to a 60,000-seater would block light into their home." At a meeting on Monday, the council agreed to acquire land at Stamford Bridge "which ensured the injunction is not valid, as the family cannot take the council to the High Court." The new stadium was granted planning permission one year ago "and has been signed off" by London Mayor Sadiq Khan. Monday's decision "means the council can take responsibility for the land in question at Chelsea's instruction and lease it back to the club," ensuring it is "not subject to legal challenge as had previously been the case." This will "only happen if the club cannot reach an agreement with the Crosthwaites" (BBC, 1/15). In London, Oliver Todd reported the deal was agreed "within five minutes at a meeting at Hammersmith Town Hall on Monday." The Crosthwaite family "could now pursue a judicial review," having said it will "take all legal action available" in a letter from its solicitors. That would "challenge the way in which the council's decision was made." As it stands, though, "work can begin on the redevelopment unless further action is taken." Chelsea had made it clear it feared there was "a very real risk the stadium would not be redeveloped" if it could not get around the Crosthwaites' High Court injunction (DAILY MAIL, 1/15). The London TELEGRAPH reported many of Crosthwaite's neighbors on the street, where properties are sold for more than £1.18M ($1.63M), "have already accepted offers of compensation." The family is "understood to have already turned down a large sum from the club." The "right to light" law gives a landowner "the right to receive sunlight through defined openings or gaps in buildings on his or her land" (TELEGRAPH, 1/15).