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Volume 26 No. 229
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Binge Watching With CAA Sports’ Arlesha Amazan

Amazan sees Netflix' "All American" as a broader metaphor for the Black experience in the U.S.
Photo: CAA
Amazan sees Netflix' "All American" as a broader metaphor for the Black experience in the U.S.
Photo: CAA
Amazan sees Netflix' "All American" as a broader metaphor for the Black experience in the U.S.
Photo: CAA

This week, THE DAILY caught up with CAA Sports Basketball Marketing Exec ARLESHA AMAZAN to break down what's on her watch list. Some responses have been edited for clarity and brevity:

  • One of my favorite selections was Season Two of “ALL AMERICAN” on Netflix. I love the main character development of SPENCER JAMES -- an African-American teenager from Crenshaw, L.A., who balances being a star high-school football athlete, a loving member of two households, a community organizer and a good friend to all who depend on him. Spencer is inspiring and a breath of fresh air, as he’s an athlete depiction not often seen on television. The show does a great job in contributing a narrative on what it means to be an athlete who can take responsibility and role-modelship on at an early age. Storylines and scenes provide glimpses into privilege, racism and the wealth gap in America. You can’t tell a story of a Black athlete’s pursuit of success at an almost all-white school without speaking to interactions with racism. As a viewer, I realized that Spencer’s experiences living in Crenshaw while attending Beverly High is a metaphor and a broader picture of the Black experience in America.
  • I got wind of Netflix’ “HOLLYWOOD” from a colleague, and it was a genius of a production, created by RYAN MURPHY and IAN BRENNAN. It breaks down the foundations of the Golden Age film era and magnifies the tribulations of black actors -- both male and female, the hushed LGBTQ community and more. It was interesting to learn more about such tribulations during this time and equate it to the modern era. While we still have a ways to go in ensuring diversity in its fullness within the entertainment industry, "Hollywood" gives viewers much to applaud in the ways in which the characters fought for their talents and dreams. We’ve certainly come a long way.

  • ESPN’s “THE LAST DANCE” did its job in showcasing unexplored sides of MICHAEL JORDAN, as well as giving me the fix I needed for sports and basketball content during this time. I, along with everyone else in America, dedicated my Sunday nights to each two-hour episode. Although it’s part of an unprecedented year that allowed for a pause in sports, “The Last Dance” is now considered a classic and moment in time that I’ll never forget as a fan and basketball lover. Through the hype and buzz that came from “The Last Dance,” as a sports marketer, it’s reinforced that while fans miss live games, what they truly want are the untold stories from athletes.
  • While Netflix’ “LOVE IS BLIND” served to be my “background content” show, I did find myself invested and rooting for LAUREN and CAMERON at the end. As cheesy as it may sound, watching this show was a reminder that one can find love in its most unexpected and random way. It’s good to see Lauren and Cameron together, happy and going strong. I, however, will stick to dating apps and coffee shops for my potential love encounters, rather than picking a mate to marry while blindfolded!

Interested in sharing your binge-watching favorites with the industry? Contact Andrew Levin at alevin@sportsbusinessdaily.com.