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Volume 27 No. 5
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Michigan Becomes Latest State To Announce NIL Legislation

Michigan lawmakers have announced legislation to become the latest state attempting to "buck NCAA bylaws prohibiting students from profiting" from the use of their name, image and likeness, according to Beth LeBlanc of the DETROIT NEWS. The legislation "would become effective" in July '20. State Rep. Brandt Iden said the NCAA is "not moving quickly enough on the issue." He added, "We believe that we need to be competitive with other states. We need to be at the forefront of this." Other states that have announced similar legislation include Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Washington (DETROIT NEWS, 11/7). Michigan state Rep. Joe Tate said of the new legislation, "We know it's a short window of time, so we want to ensure that they have all of the opportunities they can to benefit from work that they're doing ... not only for their teammates, but their colleges and universities." In Michigan, Lauren Gibbons noted that Iden and Tate's package is "expected to be introduced on the House Floor this week." Both reps said that they are "hoping it sees broad bipartisan support." Iden: "This is not a partisan issue -- this is about protecting our student athletes" (MLIVE.com, 11/6).

YOU GOT SERVED: In N.Y., Billy Witz writes a class-action lawsuit against the NCAA was filed yesterday in U.S. District Court arguing that "athletes should be paid like employees." Former Villanova DB Trey Johnson is suing the NCAA and many of its member schools, "accusing them of violating minimum-wage laws by refusing to pay their athletes." The lawsuit "argues that athletes' hours are tracked in the same way as those of students in a work-study program, and that if student ticket-takers, seating attendants and concession workers are being paid at least a minimum wage, the players performing on the field should be, too" (N.Y. TIMES, 11/7).