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Volume 26 No. 113
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Source: Lerner Family Wanted Distance From Trump WS Decision

Trump sat in Nationals Park's Washington Suite with his wife and several other Republican politicians
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Trump sat in Nationals Park's Washington Suite with his wife and several other Republican politicians
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Trump sat in Nationals Park's Washington Suite with his wife and several other Republican politicians
Photo: GETTY IMAGES

The Lerner family had "no desire to be put in a position of turning down a request from the White House for President Trump to sit with" members of the team's ownership group last night during Game 5 of the World Series, according to a source cited by Mike Wise of DC-based WUSA-CBS. The source "made it clear that at no time was a direct request made that the President not be seated next to the Lerner family, but it was made clear that the family did not want to be put in the awkward position of having to respond to a request." Trump and his wife, Melania, sat in the Washington Suite alongside several other Republican politicians. There had been speculation Trump could throw last night's ceremonial first pitch, but that honor was "decided long in advance" of Trump informing MLB of his "intentions to attend Game 5 in the past two weeks." Last night's first pitch was thrown out by celebrity chef Jose Andres, who has been "openly critical" of Trump's administration (WUSA9.com, 10/27). In N.Y., David Matthews writes the details of how the Lerners "avoided being seated near Trump," were not clear (N.Y. DAILY NEWS, 10/28). Meanwhile, YAHOO SPORTS' Mark Townsend noted Trump’s arrival "was not shown or mentioned on the Fox broadcast," while his presence was "acknowledged by broadcaster Joe Buck just before the third inning" (SPORTS.YAHOO.com, 10/27).

NOT A WARM RECEPTION: In DC, Judkis & Dawsey report when Trump last night was "announced on the public address system after the third inning as part of a tribute to veterans, the crowd roared into sustained booing" (WASHINGTON POST, 10/28). The GLOBE & MAIL's Cathal Kelly notes Trump's handlers "had the sense to surround him with wounded veterans and arrange for him to be shown during a salute to the military," as it is "hard to boo guys who've taken a bullet for the country" (GLOBE & MAIL, 10/28). However, NBC's Kristen Welker noted Trump did not receive the "warmest welcome" from the crowd ("Today," NBC, 10/28). CBS' Tony Dokoupil notes Trump received "what you would call less than a warm welcome." CBS' Gayle King said it was "so interesting to me that on a day when it's clearly a big victory for the administration" with the killing of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Trump "gets booed in Washington at the World Series game" ("CBS This Morning," 10/28).

WALKING THE TIGHTROPE: In N.Y., Peter Baker writes Trump's decision to attend Game 5 "presented a challenge" for the Nationals. The team had already asked Andres to throw out the first pitch "long before" Trump informed MLB officials that he would come. Even if "unintended, it was a bit of trolling," given that Andres has been a "vocal critic of the president" (N.Y. TIMES, 10/28). The GLOBE & MAIL's Kelly wrote it is "hard not to view" the Nationals inviting Andres as an "attempt to please both sides of the divide" (GLOBE & MAIL, 10/26).

TEAM SPIRIT: In DC, Scott Allen noted the roughly 250 full-time Nationals employees who work out of the team's offices at Nationals Park "received a company email offering them the chance to attend Game 1" in Houston. They could "bring a guest, and the team would cover the costs of a charter flight, tickets and a hotel." About 200 people "from various departments" made the trip. Red rally towels "draped the seats" of last Tuesday's charter flight back to Houston, which "included a specially prepared meal" (WASHINGTON POST, 10/26).