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Volume 26 No. 113
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A10 Commissioner: NIL Rights Complicated, Handle With Care

Atlantic 10 Commissioner Bernadette McGlade "doesn't use the word paid" when discussing name, image and likeness bills and their affect on college sports, believing that it is "best to choose your words carefully," according to Mike Jensen of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER. McGlade said there "should be some consideration for more permissive legislation" when it comes to athletes' compensation, but the system "can't move into a pay-for-play model." As an example of the "issue's complexity," McGlade pointed to then-Notre Dame G Arike Ogunbowale competing on ABC's "Dancing With The Stars" in '18 after receiving special permission from the NCAA. McGlade: "Obviously, she's not turning pro and being paid for that, but her athletic skill and ability is somewhat in play. I do think we have to address that within the organization" (PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, 10/28). Meanwhile, FAU AD Brian White is "taking a caution approach" to the issue. He said in a statement he supports the "idea of student-athletes profiting from their name, image and likeness," though he is concerned about the "potential for unintended consequences" (PALM BEACH POST, 10/27).

CHANGE IS OVERDUE: In Tampa, Graham Brink wrote it is "time to upgrade an archaic system that financially hamstrings student athletes for no other reason than being good at a sport" (TAMPA BAY TIMES, 10/27). TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE's Brian Wakamo wrote for all intents and purposes, college athletes are "workers, breaking their backs for their bosses and employers to get rich" (TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE, 10/27). In Daytona Beach, Ken Willis wrote, "Take your side and feel free to argue into the night. But know this: It doesn't matter. It's coming. Big change." It is "quite amazing" that athlete NIL rights "took this long, really" (Daytona Beach NEWS-JOURNAL, 10/27). In Dallas, Kevin Sherrington wrote of NIL rights, he "wouldn't string this out," as states are moving fast on the issue. California's law "doesn't go into effect" until '23, but Florida and other states are "aiming sooner." Sherrington: "We can't wait. We're leaking too much talent as it is" (DALLAS MORNING NEWS, 10/26).