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Volume 26 No. 231
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Kentucky's Calipari Could Advocate For NIL Bill in Bluegrass State

Calipari does not expect state NIL bills to ultimately work and said Congress will need to weigh in
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Calipari does not expect state NIL bills to ultimately work and said Congress will need to weigh in
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Calipari does not expect state NIL bills to ultimately work and said Congress will need to weigh in
Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Univ. of Kentucky men's basketball coach John Calipari has "long been in favor of players making money off their own name and likeness," but he is "not as keen on being nailed down to a specific opinion about California's Fair Play to Pay Act," according to Jon Hale of the Louisville COURIER JOURNAL. Calipari was "not willing to endorse the California law." But he said yesterday that he was "ready to go to the Kentucky state house to advocate for the Bluegrass State passing its own, presumably so UK and the state's other programs are not at a disadvantage recruiting against programs in states where players can make money from endorsement deals." He then said that he does "not expect those state laws to ultimately work though, and that Congress will ultimately have to weigh in to avoid a situation where states each have different rules." Calipari said that he "expects whatever rule change the governing body ultimately puts forth 'will not be enough'" (Louisville COURIER JOURNAL, 10/10). Meanwhile, Univ. of Louisville AD Vince Tyra weighed in on the topic, and he said that the "majority of student-athletes' brands benefit from the university." Tyra: "We are all going to mention Zion. I'm trying to look at it more pragmatically that if you undress the brand and look at them on a stand-alone basis, how would they go about it" (Louisville COURIER JOURNAL, 10/10).

NET PROFITS: USA TODAY's Mark Emmert examined how much athletes could benefit from the ability to profit off their name, image and likeness. Football is "by far the most popular sport in America, so it's no surprise that those athletes stand to get a financial benefit that no others will." It "may come in the form of annual payments from EA Sports, assuming that company revives its 'NCAA Football' game once the names, images and likenesses rules take effect." Jersey sales also could be a "new source of revenue." If apparel companies can "make and sell jerseys of the starting quarterback or leading scorer on the basketball team, some of the profit would be split between the university and the athlete" (USA TODAY, 10/10).

SUPPORT GROUP: Warriors F Draymond Green in a special to the WASHINGTON POST writes that he supports California's NIL law. People "argue that changing these rules will destroy college athletics," but the California bill "does not say the NCAA needs to pay athletes." It "won't slow the money that pours into the NCAA." In fact, it "might keep players in college longer" (WASHINGTON POST, 10/10).