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Volume 27 No. 7
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Krzyzewski Speaks Out In Support Of Pushing Forward NIL Laws

Krzyzewski believes college athletics has been too reactionary in dealing with changes to its system
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Krzyzewski believes college athletics has been too reactionary in dealing with changes to its system
Photo: GETTY IMAGES
Krzyzewski believes college athletics has been too reactionary in dealing with changes to its system
Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Duke men's basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski has spoken publicly about the NCAA's name, image and likeness issue, saying that college sports "can no longer stick its head in the sand on that issue and others," according to Steve Reed of the AP. Krzyzewski yesterday at the ACC media days said, "We need to look at that, as a whole issue, not just this one thing for image and likeness. What's best for these kids? We need to stay current with what's happening." He said of the new California NIL law, "I'm glad it was passed because it pushes the envelope a little, it pushes the issue." ACC Commissioner John Swofford said the California law is "extreme." He added that he would "prefer to see it resolved on a national level rather than by individual states." He also expressed some concern, saying, "We have to be really careful about unintended consequences that can come with it." Krzyzewski said that college athletics has been "too reactionary in dealing with changes as opposed to proactively seeking reforms to the collegiate model" (AP, 10/8). YAHOO SPORTS' Pete Thamel wrote Krzyzewski's words were "interpreted around college athletics as verbal shots lobbed at NCAA headquarters." The issue with "demanding action" from NCAA President Mark Emmert is that he has "made a career out of hiding behind legislation, committees and outsourcing responsibility to others" (SPORTS.YAHOO.com, 10/8).

COACH SPEAK: ESPN.com's David Hale noted several other ACC coaches yesterday "offered commentary similar to that of Krzyzewski," including Notre Dame's Mike Brey and Louisville's Chris Mack. The latter said that he has "changed his perspective on the issue in recent years." Mack: "The money, the TV contracts, every conference has its own network now. I don't know what it looks like. I'm not an economist. ... But I am on the side that thinks student-athletes should be able to capitalize on their name, image and likeness." However, Brey said that he believes the "overall value of name, image and likeness rights for most athletes will not be significant." He added, "What's really the marketability of some of these guys? How many jerseys are they really going to sell?" (ESPN.com, 10/8). Virginia's Tony Bennett said, "It needs to be investigated further. I'm all for the student-athletes having more opportunities to receive funding, whether it's through the name and likeness, if it can be fairly equitable and doesn't affect the game and other sports and all that in a bad way" (ROANOKE TIMES, 10/9).

THE RESISTANCE: Kansas Chancellor Douglas Girod said that state and federal law is "not the best way to change NCAA regulations regarding athletes receiving compensation through endorsements." Girod said that "contradiction could complicate how universities will be expected to meet NCAA regulations when one of the largest states is operating on a different system." He added, "I'm concerned it's going to make a complex environment even more complex. ... Where's the line there? I think it's going to be really hard to manage" (LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD, 10/8).

THOUGHTS FROM THE PAST: Former NCAA President Cedric Dempsey believes that college athletes profiting off their name, image and likeness could bring an "apocalyptic shift for school sports." Dempsey said that U.S. Supreme Court intervention "may be the only hope for preserving the unique system that exists now." He said that California's NIL law is the "crest of a slippery slope." Dempsey "predicted a flurry of lawsuits that the high court will ultimately be called on to resolve." But he said that he "hopes justices will recognize the need to limit financial influence on student athletes." Dempsey: "One time, I said I thought Congress would be a part of that, but right now, I wouldn't want it in their hands. But I do think the Supreme Court will need to be involved" (FOXBUSINESS.com, 10/8).