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Volume 27 No. 7
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NBC Likely To Back Off Of Skycam Shots After Notre Dame Experiment

NBC used a sideline skycam as the primary start-of-play shot for New Mexico-Notre Dame on Saturday, but viewers "probably can expect a more traditional-looking telecast" when Notre Dame returns to the net next week against Virginia, according to Andy Staples of THE ATHLETIC. NBC Coordinating Producer Rob Hyland knew the decision to use the sideline skycam "would elicit a reaction." Some people "got queasy," while others "got angry." Nearly everyone "had an opinion." NBC had "warned viewers ahead of time that the sideline skycam would be the primary view on most plays" and asked everyone to tune into the game "with an open mind." Hyland said, "We took a lot of chances with the camera, and we were very aggressive with it." The difference "might have been too drastic." The camera can "struggle on quick passes to the near sideline."  And though it "didn’t swoop as much as it did when NBC tested it during the Notre Dame spring game, it did wobble occasionally before snaps -- producing a disorienting effect." Hyland: "There were a number of situations where we should have used the play-by-play camera." Going forward, Hyland will "bring back" a lot of the familiar camera angles and "mix it in with the new camera" (THEATHLETIC.com, 9/18).

HIGH PRAISE: In Philadelphia, Rob Tornoe noted NBC used the "'High Sky' camera angle from 50 feet in the air" during its "SNF" telecast of Eagles-Falcons. NBC "SNF" Exec Producer Fred Gaudelli before the Week 2 matchup called the new camera angle a “work in progress.” He said that his team had "made adjustments during Week 1 broadcasts, where it was only used sparingly." However, one viewer who "appreciated the higher angle" was John Madden. Gaudelli said, "Madden texted me during the game, and he was like, ‘You’re finally showing people the horizontal aspect of football,’ which you don’t get with the regular play-by-play cameras" (PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, 9/15).