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Volume 26 No. 179
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Tennessee Makes Progress Toward Legalizing Online Sports Betting

Legislation to legalize online sports betting in Tennessee passed yesterday in the state's House of Representatives despite a "spirited debate from members worried about the effects of gambling addiction," according to Natalie Allison of the Nashville TENNESSEAN. The legislation would "permit online sports gambling in the state, though an amendment to the legislation removed a provision that would allow for betting in brick-and-mortar locations." The bill was also "approved in the Senate Finance committee" and will now "head to the Senate floor for a vote." Tax revenue from the sports gambling industry is "projected to bring in an estimated" $50M each year. The legislation "includes a list of types of people prohibited from making sports wagers -- including the athletes and team owners involved, people who run sports betting operations and others with influence over a game's outcome -- and makes it a misdemeanor if they do cast bets" (Nashville TENNESSEAN, 4/25).

INDIANA TAKING STEPS: In Indianapolis, Lange & Herron note state lawmakers "approved a massive, controversial gaming bill that legalizes sports wagering and allows a new Terre Haute casino." The bill, which now heads to Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb, "legalizes sports wagering in casinos and on mobile devices for people age 21 and older." Residents could potentially "gamble from anywhere in the state on their mobile devices" (INDIANAPOLIS STAR, 4/25).

WORRIED ABOUT COLLEGES: In Raleigh, Jonathan Alexander notes NBA Commissioner Emeritus David Stern believes that the "risk of corruption is greater with college sports than with professional sports" when it comes to legal betting. Stern on Tuesday was the keynote speaker at a sports betting symposium put on by Elon Univ., and he said, "College kids can be more easily influenced. Especially in potentially corrupt cultures.” Stern said that he was "in favor of creating a uniform system regulated by the federal government with safeguards in place." He added that he "sees a lot of risks with states regulating their own programs" (Raleigh NEWS & OBSERVER, 4/25).