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Volume 25 No. 107
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State Farm Arena's New Videoboard One Of The Largest In NBA

State Farm Arena's new center scoreboard will be 27.75-feet high and total 4,477 square feet
Photo: HAWKS

The new centerboard at State Farm Arena will be one of the three largest in the NBA. The board will have underbelly displays offering better views for fans near the court. All told, the Hawks' venue will have 20 new LED video displays from Utah-based Prismview. The venue also will now have 12,047 square feet of total video space with more than 30.4 million individual LED pixels. Hawks CEO Steve Koonin said the goal is to become the "most video-centric" sports venue in the U.S. The arena will have 10 times more LED video boards and displays and what is being touted as a first-of-its-kind, new 360-degree center scoreboard when it reopens later this month after a $192.5M renovation. The new center scoreboard will be 27.75-feet high and total 4,477 square feet. The old scoreboard was 960 square feet. Prismview President & CEO Don Szczepaniak said the size, quality and scope of the scoreboard and other new video displays will stand out to fans at the renovated arena. Szczepaniak: “It is such a big canvas. You can’t help but notice it." Szczepaniak said video display boards and equipment from the smaller, existing center board are being re-purposed and used as corner video boards throughout the arena. “This is a first for us,” Szczepaniak said of the re-purposing effort. Prismview is a division of Samsung, who also installed a centerhung scoreboard at Rogers Place in Edmonton add videoboards at M&T Bank Stadium and Audi Field (Mike Sunnucks, THE DAILY). Koonin said that the "extreme emphasis" on video displays in the renovated State Farm Arena "reflects the proliferation of screens in people's daily lives, from smartphones to supersized high-definition TVs." Koonin: "Screens are more important that they have ever been. We live with screens. Just a few short years ago, we weren't a screen culture" (AJC.com, 10/12).