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Volume 26 No. 207

Marketing and Sponsorship

Smith in an Instagram post alluded to the NBA targeting him specifically
Photo: NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Smith in an Instagram post alluded to the NBA targeting him specifically
Photo: NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Smith in an Instagram post alluded to the NBA targeting him specifically
Photo: NBAE/GETTY IMAGES

Cavaliers G J.R. Smith said that he "hasn't contacted the league regarding the 'Supreme' tattoo on his right calf that they asked him to cover up," and he "doesn't plan on having that conversation," according to Chris Fedor of the Cleveland PLAIN DEALER. Smith was "notified by the league office on Sept. 30 that he would have to cover it up or get fined." In an Instagram response, Smith "alluded to the league targeting him specifically and allowing other NBA players to get away with branding." Smith said the league told him the issue with the tattoo was "branding." Smith: "But I'm not the only person with brands on me so it's more than that. I know that. They know that. Everyone knows that." For the Cavaliers-Celtics preseason game last night, Smith's socks "covered up about half [of] the tattoo, with the 'S-u-p-r' the only portion visible." Smith has "yet to decide what -- if anything -- he will use to keep it hidden consistently" throughout the season to "appease the league office" (Cleveland PLAIN DEALER, 10/3). ESPN's Jalen Rose said the situation with Smith is a "unique, slippery slope" because everything "you put on yourself as a tattoo is an advertisement." ESPN's Mike Greenberg: "I understand why they feel this one's different." Rose: "Because they're not getting paid for it" ("Get Up," ESPN, 10/3).

TV's "biggest property" -- the NFL -- might have "hit a ceiling in commercial prices, at least for now," according to Jeanine Poggi of AD AGE. After two years of "price hikes" for a 30-second spot on NBC's "SNF," those increases have "stalled this season." Advertisers are "paying $665,677 on average for a 30-second spot in the broadcast, about $30,000 less than the $699,602 advertisers paid last year." Still, "SNF" remains "by far the most expensive TV show for advertisers (excluding Fox's late-national NFL games on Sunday afternoons, which are not technically in prime time and average over $700,000 a pop)." The "TNF" package on Fox has experienced the "same lull as Sunday nights." Advertisers are "paying $434,078 on average for a commercial" on "TNF," compared with about $550,000 for the games on CBS and NBC last year. During the '17-18 TV season, "TNF" across CBS and NBC "tied for second place among broadcast's most expensive shows, again deadlocked for No. 2, this time with NBC's 'This Is Us'" (ADAGE.com, 10/2).

NET
PROGRAM
DAY/TIME (ET)
'18 PRICE
'17 PRICE
% CHANGE
NBC
"Sunday Night Football"
Sunday 8:00pm
$655,677
$699,602
-5%
Fox
"Thursday Night Football"
Thursday 8:00pm
$434,078
n/a
n/a
ABC
College football
Saturday 8:00pm
$92,936
$97,004
-4%
Fox
College football
Saturday 8:00pm
$67,277
$82,599
-19%
Download the
Ad Prices

USA TODAY's Andrew Joseph noted No. 1 overall pick Deandre Ayton in his preseason debut with the Suns on Monday "wasn’t wearing Puma sneakers," but instead sporting Nike Kobe AD shoes with the Nike logo "taped over." But the move "wasn’t a shot at Puma," as it "appeared to be a step taken with the blessing" of Puma, which signed Ayton shortly before the draft. Ayton "wears a Size 18 sneaker, and the company was in the process of developing a shoe in both Ayton’s size and desired specification." Ayton was "testing out the Puma sneakers" in yesterday's practice (USATODAY.com, 10/2). Ayton also wore Nike during the NBA Summer League (THE DAILY).

GET THAT PAPER: ESPN.com's Rich Cimini noted NFL Jets RB Isaiah Crowell is now "promoting a product called Dude Wipes, which bills itself as a toilet-paper substitute for men" and the company is "promoting Crowell on Twitter." Crowell, after scoring a TD on "TNF" in Week 3 against the Browns, "pretended to defecate in the end zone, then wiped his rear end with the football before throwing it into the crowd" (ESPN.com, 10/2).

JUST THE RIGHT FIT: USA TODAY's Nina Mandell noted Heat G Dwyane Wade is "releasing a new line of leisure socks to honor Wade County -- his own tribute to Miami as he plays what he said will be his final season in the NBA." It is the "first line released by Wade’s own sock company, PKWY, which he founded in partnership" with sock-maker Stance (USATODAY.com, 10/2).