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Volume 24 No. 198
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Olympic Notes: Doping Case Could Hurt Russia's Standing With IOC

A doping case involving Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitsky "could affect whether or not his team will march behind the Russian flag" at next Sunday's Closing Ceremony. Traces of meldonium were found in Krushelnitsky's A-sample. An IOC group will decide Saturday "whether or not to lift the suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee over doping." OAR athletes "could display the Russian flag during their march" in the Closing Ceremony if the ban is lifted (YONHAP NEWS, 2/19). Several IOC members following Krushelnitsky's positive test are "privately suggesting" that allowing the Russian flag at the Closing Ceremony "would risk appearing to appease Russia and could undercut an effort to play up the peacemaking presence of a North Korea delegation at the Games" (N.Y. TIMES, 2/19).

LIKE CLOCKWORK: IOC TOP sponsor Omega has "deployed 300 employees, supplied 230 tons of equipment and enlisted the help of 350 volunteers" at the Pyeongchang Games. Omega Timing CEO Alain Zobrist said that each sport "has its own rules and requires specific equipment" and estimated that "more than 1,000 different devices will be used to assess the events" (WSJ.com, 2/16).

SENSORY OVERLOAD: In N.Y., David Segal wrote being in Pyeongchang is a "feast for the senses." People can be "lit up by the food, which is super spicy, or super sweet, or sometimes a bit of both." Attendees can be "freezing outdoors one moment and sweating in an overheated bus the next." There are "bright colors and brash graphics, a combination found everywhere, especially on television." Segal: "Just about everything here is bold" (NYTIMES.com, 2/17).