SBJ/July 17-23, 2017/People and Pop Culture

Summer reading

It’s time again to take a deep dive into the book lists of people in the sports industry, both what they’re reading now as well as the classics that have shaped their lives and their careers.

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LINDSEY
ELIZABETH LINDSEY

Managing partner, Wasserman


What are you reading now?
Just started “The Next 100 Years,” by George Friedman. Figured with how quickly this world is changing, I ought to read ahead a little to get prepared.

Tell us about a recent favorite.
“Big Little Lies,” by Liane Moriarty. Great read — she’s a compelling writer. And despite the heavy subject matter, it was uplifting reading about such different women who ultimately came together to take care of each other.

What’s the best book you’ve ever read?
“Postmortem,” by Patricia Cornwell. I’m a sucker for a good mystery, and she’s one of the best there is at writing them. This was her first novel to introduce the inimitable Dr. Kay Scarpetta as a character. And boy — what a character.

What book that you read as a young person has stuck with you?
The Nancy Drew series. As a little girl in the late ’70s/early ’80s, there weren’t a ton of strong female characters to identify with. We were supposed to be princesses — and, shocker, I just didn’t see myself in that. Nancy Drew showed what smart, tenacious and independent could look like in a young woman. It gave me something to look up to and to strive for.

What’s a business book you would recommend to everyone?
“Outliers,” by Malcolm Gladwell. Real insight into what drives success and the hard work it takes to hone a craft. Nothing does — or should — come easy.

Paper or digital? Or both?
Both. Digital while flying is fine, but I still prefer paper sitting on a beach or by the pool, something I try to do as often as I can.

What’s next on your list?
“Chaos,” the most recent Scarpetta novel from Cornwell. I’m waiting to pick up the paperback for summer vacay reading.


LOGAN
LAWTON LOGAN

Principal, The Whitener Co.


What are you reading now?
“Kitchen Confidential,” by Anthony Bourdain, was lying around my house for years and I just picked it up. Great read.

Tell us about a recent favorite.
“More Than Rivals,” by Ken Abraham, is an inspiring true story and terrific book. It’s a sports story but has a much broader message.

What’s the best book you’ve ever read?
“Liar’s Poker,” by Michael Lewis. I am a big fan of Michael Lewis, and this inside look at Wall Street in the late 1980s stands the test of time. I recently reread the book and it was as gripping and funny as the first time I read it.

What book that you read as a young person has stuck with you?
All of the Dr. Seuss books. I loved the crazy pictures and rhymes.

What’s a business book you would recommend to everyone?
“The Hard Thing About Hard Things,” by Ben Horowitz. Funny, straightforward and filled with great advice.

Paper or digital? Or both?
Both. I like the feel of a book, but digital is so much easier when I travel.

What’s next on your list?
“Live From New York: The Complete, Uncensored History of ‘Saturday Night Live,’” by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales. I like the oral history format — getting the inside scoop from the people involved.


DAWKINS
KEITH DAWKINS

EVP, TeenNick and Nicktoons


What are you reading now?
“The Lincoln Myth,” by Steve Berry … along with every month’s U.S. and British GQ magazines, and U.S. and U.K. Men’s Health magazines. And let’s not forget all of the various sports news outlets. I have to keep up with the exciting offseason sports news.

Tell us about a recent favorite.
“1Q84,” by Haruki Murakami. It’s big, dense, layered, smart, visual, thoughtful and provocative.

What’s the best book you’ve ever read?
There’s no single answer, but “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” by Harriet Beecher Stowe, comes to mind. It’s still so relevant to many of today’s biggest topics and issues.

What book that you read as a young person has stuck with you?
“Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing,” by Judy Blume, and short stories about John Henry and his strength with his hammer. Plus, any sports bios or stories that I could get my hands on.

What’s a business book you would recommend to everyone?
I don’t read business books, but much of what I read guides my thoughts on being an emotionally intelligent and thoughtful leader.

Paper or digital? Or both?
Hard cover! Old school. I love the weight of it, and they look nice on my bookshelf at home.

What’s next on your list?
Not sure, but I think I have a Haruki Murakami book next to my bed waiting for me.


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