SBJ/March 27 - April 2, 2006/SBJ In Depth

The changing face of the U.S. market

World Congress Panelists
Cathy Bessant
Global marketing executive
Bank of America
Peter McLoughlin
VP, corporate media
Anheuser-Busch
Bill Pearce
CMO
Taco Bell
Becky Saeger
Executive VP, CMO
Charles Schwab
Joe Uva
President, CEO
OMD Worldwide
Look through U.S. Census data for the past 10-plus years and the changes are obvious. We live in a nation that is growing older, with middle-age Americans (30-59) making up the biggest share of the population. And we live in a nation that has seen a tremendous rise in the number of Hispanic residents — nearly 60 percent growth from 1990-2004.

To further understand the growth of the U.S. Hispanic population, consider this: Their population of 41.4 million in 2004 represented 14.1 percent of the country. That’s enough to make Hispanics the country’s largest minority group. Additionally, the rate of population growth of Hispanic 13- to 19-year-olds is six times that of non-Hispanic teens. The U.S. Census projects that Hispanics will make up 15.5 percent of the total U.S. population by 2010.

What sports are Hispanics paying attention to? Soccer is the easy answer, but you may be surprised to know that ESPN Sports Poll data shows that from 2000 to 2004, Hispanic avidity for college basketball and college football grew at a faster rate than their avidity for Major League Soccer.

As for the overall population, the challenge for teams, leagues and sports marketers is to find ways to make sports matter to more people, as between 2000 and 2004 most major sports had seen a drop in fan avidity.







In this section:

Growth in Hispanic population since 1990
U.S. population trends
Hispanic interest in major sports
Examining sports avidity levels


Growth in Hispanic population since 1990

The map shows Hispanic population growth by U.S. region. The chart below shows Big Four markets with the largest growth in Hispanic population, designated “hypergrowth” by the U.S. Census.

Metropolitan area
Total market population
Total Hispanic population
(change since 1990)
Charlotte
1,499,293
77,092 (685%)
Raleigh-Durham
1,187,941
72,580 (631%)
Nashville
1,231,311
40,139 (454%)
Atlanta
4,112,198
268,851 (388%)
Memphis
1,135,614
27,520 (265%)
Indianapolis
1,607,486
42,994 (261%)
Minneapolis-St. Paul
2,968,806
99,121 (189%)
Portland
1,918,009
142,444 (189%)
Columbus
1,540,157
28,115 (181%)
Orlando
1,644,561
271,627 (175%)
Source: U.S. Census

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U.S. population trends

The pie charts below show various demographics and their percentage of the U.S. population, according to figures from the U.S. Census.

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Hispanic interest in major sports

Thirty-six percent of all Hispanics described themselves as avid fans of at least one sport in 2004, the most recent year ethnic data is available from the ESPN Sports Poll. That compares to 29.8 percent for the total population, according to ESPN Sports Poll data cited in SGMA’s recently released “The Hispanic Market Report 2006.”

To read: 43.4 percent of Hispanics in the United States claimed to have an interest in Major League Soccer in 2004, up 1.8 from 41.6 percent in 2000.

Source: ESPN Sports Poll data cited in SGMA’s “The Hispanic Market Report 2006”

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Examining sports avidity levels

Since 1996, ESPN Sports Poll has surveyed approximately 2,000 people ages 12 or older each month. Below is a look at the “Twelve Sport Index,” a composite of respondents who claim to be an avid, or highest level, fan of at least one of the following sports entities: NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, college football, college basketball, PGA Tour, NASCAR, figure skating, boxing, MLS, ATP or WTA.

Avid sports fans
2000
28.1%
2001
27.8%
2002
29.2%
2003
30.0%
2004
29.8%
2005
29.6%
Source: ESPN Sports Poll

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