SBJ/May 11 - 17, 1998/No Topic Name

Kentucky Derby win is an equine family affair

 

George Santosuosso screamed so loudly as Real Quiet won the Kentucky Derby that people around him at Churchill Downs thought he had won the race himself.

In a way he had.

Santosuosso, an Ohio-based horse owner, owns a 2-year old colt sired by Quiet American—also the sire of Derby Winner Real Quiet. When Real Quiet crossed the wire first, the price tag on Santosuoss’s colt, American Spy, increased from $65,000 to $120,000, he said.

And the price will go higher if Real Quiet wins the Triple Crown. "To be sitting here with A Quiet American colt is like holding a winning lottery ticket, only you just don’t know how much you have won," he said.

America’s most famous race usually has some kind of financial ripple effect around the winner, said Dick Lossen, a Lexington, KY-based blood stock agent. Among the beneficiaries this year are owners of mares in foal to Quiet American, as well as Quiet American yearlings and 2-year old, he added.

Another winner is Gainsborough Farm, which is owned by Sheik Maktoum al Maktoum, vice president of the United Arab Emirates and the ruler of Dubai. Lossen speculated that the farm will raise Quiet American’s stud fee from $20,000 per live foal this season to about $35,000 next year.

Allen Kershaw, farm manager of Gainsborough, said Quiet American’s stud fee "probably will be raised next year," but he declined to speculate on how much.

The sire, who began his career at stud several years ago, hasn’t always been so popular, booking only 31 mares one year, compared to an average of 80 to 100 mares for the most sought-after studs, Kershaw said. But he expects that Quiet American’s book will be full for the next years at least.

"A lot of people are calling to see if they can slip a mare in," Kershaw said. However, he added, the breeding season will be over in a few months and his "book is full."

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