SBD/October 18, 2016/Marketing and Sponsorship

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  • Ad Rates For NFL Broadcast TV Packages Rising Despite Ratings Drop, But "MNF" Down

    While NFL ratings have "tumbled in recent weeks," the league's broadcast TV packages remain the "priciest property for advertisers," according to Brian Steinberg of VARIETY. The cost for a 30-second ad during "Thursday Night Football" on CBS this season has risen nearly 15% to $529,989, while the price on NBC’s "SNF" is up nearly 2% to $650,000. NBC also is getting $503,463 per 30-second spot during its first season with half of the "TNF" package. An NBC Sports spokesperson said that the net is "seeking $560,000 in negotiations" for ads during its NFL games. However, advertisers have had "cause for concern in early autumn." Football games "continue to attract some of TV’s biggest crowds, but, due to multiple factors, those audiences have been smaller this season." Media buying firm Amplifi VP & Dir of Programming Billie Gold said, "We wouldn’t say it is one direct reason that is causing the down-tick in ratings this season, but a cumulative effect of a number of circumstances." Gold added that poor matchups and "increasing attention on the presidential race" are two "potential" factors contributing to the NFL viewership decline. There also is "more football available on more TV networks, thanks to the NFL’s recent decision to split Thursday-night games among NBC and CBS." While the NFL is seeing increases for the broadcast TV packages, the average price for a 30-second ad on ESPN's "MNF" is "on the decline" (VARIETY.com, 10/17).

    MOST-EXPENSIVE SHOWS FOR ADVERTISERS FOR '16-17 TV SEASON
    PROGRAM
    NET
    DAY
    30-SECOND COST
    PREV.
    % +/-
    "SNF"
    NBC
    Sun.
    $650,000
    $637,330
    +1.99%
    "TNF"
    CBS
    Thurs.
    $529,989
    $462,622
    +14.6%
    "TNF"
    NBC
    Thurs.
    $505,463
    n/a
    n/a
    "The Walking Dead"
    AMC
    Sun.
    $470,410
    $502,500
    -6.4%
    "Empire"
    Fox
    Wed.
    $442,413
    $521,794
    -15.2%
    "MNF"
    ESPN
    Mon.
    $371,793
    $388,176
    -4.2%
    "The Big Bang Theory"
    CBS
    Mon.
    $313,119
    $289,621
    +8.1%
    "The Big Bang Theory"
    CBS
    Thurs.
    $253,099
    $266,163
    -4.9%
    "Star"
    Fox
    Thurs.
    $240,572
    n/a
    n/a
    "This Is Us"
    NBC
    Thurs.
    $237,910
    n/a
    n/a

    Print | Tags: Marketing and Sponsorship, NFL
  • Tiger Woods Folds All Existing Businesses Into New Company TGR, With Plans To Expand

    Tiger Woods yesterday launched TGR, a "new company that will house a portfolio of Woods-related businesses," according to Elizabeth Segran of FAST COMPANY. Woods will serve as Chair and "plans to be closely involved in day-to-day decision-making." He is bringing "all of his existing businesses under a single umbrella for the first time and will also pursue new endeavors under the TGR brand." The company gives Woods a "unified corporate structure that will serve as a home base for all of his businesses moving forward." Woods is "wagering that the move will help define his legacy and keep him in the game." TGR will now "oversee TGR Live, his events company that organizes PGA Tour tournaments; his The Woods restaurant, which opened last year (its name will stay the same); TGR Design, a golf-course firm he launched a decade ago; and his charity, the Tiger Woods Foundation, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this month." Several new endeavors are "set to be announced over the next few months." There are curently "no specific plans for TGR to enter the equipment business." But Sub Rosa COO Jeff Kempler, the corporate strategy and branding firm that Woods hired to help develop his new brand, said that it is a "possibility at some point." Sub Rosa wanted to "create a business that could exist apart from its namesake." Kempler: "How can Tiger's global fame and recognizability both empower the new brand, but not create a dependency that would undo longevity?" Now that TGR has launched, the team is "considering where to go next." One "candidate for growth" is Woods' restaurant business. There also is "potential to grow Woods's 10-year-old golf-course-design company" (FASTCOMPANY.com, 10/17). GOLF.com's Pete Madden noted the rebrand to TGR marks a "shift away from the TW logo that has accompanied Woods' business ventures for years" (GOLF.com, 10/18).

    FOLLOW IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS? GOLF DIGEST's Mike Stachura noted it is "not clear what this new entity will bring, as it seems to be serving as both an umbrella and a startup." Kempler described the future in a "corporate-speaky way that hints at Woods' eventually limited future playing career." The move "seems reminiscent of the kinds of moves other elite athletes have made in the past." Stachura: "Is Woods positioning himself like Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Greg Norman, all of whose corporations make gobs of money without their namesakes being competitive golfers? Is Woods following the lead of other elite athletes like Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson and LeBron James, who have become or are on the verge of becoming business icons beyond any sneaker deals they ever signed?" (GOLFDIGEST.com, 10/17). Golf Channel's Matt Adams said this is the "next stage for Tiger, but it doesn't mean that the playing, active stage is going to be left behind right now." Adams: "He still desperately ... wants to be out there." Golf Channel's Tripp Isenhour: "You're not going to play forever, and that business part of it -- Tiger Woods is going to be very successful. It's just a conglomeration of all his different stuff. ... This was going to happen, regardless” (“Golf Central,” Golf Channel, 10/18).

    Print | Tags: Marketing and Sponsorship, Golf
  • Beckham's Focus On Endorsements, Marketing Questioned Prior To Breakout Game

    Beckham this offseason launched his own clothing line, among other ventures

    Giants WR Odell Beckham Jr. had a career-high 222 yards receiving on Sunday after what had been a disappointing start to his season, and ESPN's Jonathan Coachman wondered if that slow start was because Beckham was "shooting so many commercials" during the offseason, "taking away from (his) preparation time." Speaking during the first half of the Giants' 27-23 win over the Ravens, Coachman acknowledged Beckham is the player "every company wanted." But he added, "I just wonder if the frustration level is at such a fever pitch because he came into the season not nearly as focused. Yes, you’ve got time (in the offseason) to shoot the commercials and prepare. But what about all those calls when your agent calls you and says, ‘Hey, we had this company call, this company called. We’ve got to decide what we’re going to do. We need to meet for two or three hours on Wednesday to go over this.’ All those types of things can now mentally start taking you away from the start of the season. I personally believe there’s something to it." ESPN's Max Bretos said the number of ads Beckham appears in has been "relentless." But ESPN's Tom Waddle said Beckham is "not thinking about his next marketing deal as he lines up" on the field. Waddle: "We’re talking about mutually exclusive issues here. I think you can get your work done and be prepared for a season and at the same time go out there and be willing to gather whatever the market is willing to bear from a marketing standpoint. Peyton and Eli Manning have done it” ("Max & The Coach with Tom Waddle," ESPN Radio, 10/16).

    LOOK AT ME: Beckham has made as many headlines this year with his sideline antics as he has with his play, and that includes a 15-yard penalty for taking his helmet off after scoring the go-ahead touchdown late in Sunday's game. ESPN's Tim Hasselbeck noted Beckham is a "great player," but said, "When you don't care about how your actions affect everybody else on that football team and you care more about yourself than everyone else, it's selfish." Hasselbeck: "It's entertaining, all that stuff, but it's selfish. It's about him and not about the team.” ESPN's Mark Dominik siad, "When you take the helmet off, you're saying, ‘Me first.’ That's where I'd be having a conversation saying, ‘It's not ‘me,’ it's ‘we’" ("NFL Insiders," ESPN, 10/17). ESPN's Steve Young said, "He can have a lot of fun and even have antics, but bring the guys with you. When it’s just you and you leave everybody else behind, you cost them penalties and you're not caring about the big picture, then football will leave you" ("Monday Night Countdown," ESPN, 10/17). But NBC’s Mike Florio said with Beckham, the Giants "take the good with the bad, and as long as the good outweighs the bad, well, we'll deal with the bad." Florio: "When the guy plays as well as he does, when he is a game-changer, one of the very few game-changers in the NFL right now, you find a way to look over the warts" ("PFT," NBCSN, 10/18).

    DRAWING ON HIS OWN EXPERIENCES: ESPN's Randy Moss reflected on his career and said when he was "young and doing those things," any direction to curtail his actions "had to come from the front office." Moss: "When you’re looking at Odell Beckham Jr., the head coach isn't going to do it, he's young. Eli Manning isn’t going to do it; he probably won't listen to Eli. The man who writes the check each and every week with his name on the check is the owner, and if the owner can't sit Odell Beckham down and be able to talk to him about where he's going with these antics, that’s bad." Moss added Beckham's antics are "good for TV," but football "is a team sport" ("Monday Night Countdown," ESPN, 10/17).

    NET GAINS
    : In New Jersey, Art Stapleton writes there is "always a story line surrounding Beckham, a dynamic player whom drama always seems to follow." However, there is "some irony in Beckham being accused of making a mockery of the game with his kicking net charades when the mocking of him with that said net on back pages, social media, sports radio and 'SportsCenter' contributed to it getting this far." Stapleton: "In a way, this is Beckham mocking everything about the controversy" (Bergen RECORD, 10/18).

    Print | Tags: Marketing and Sponsorship
  • Marketplace Roundup

    In Michigan, Aaron McMann notes Pistons F Stanley Johnson had been "complaining of pain in his left foot since at least Saturday," prompting the team to want him to "start wearing a different shoe on the court." Johnson reportedly "signed a shoe deal with Nike" in August '15 and has been "sporting the Kobe Bryant-style kicks ever since." Pistons coach Stan Van Gundy said, "It's coming from the shoes he's wearing. ... But Stanley, who is not the least bit hard-headed, wants to continue to wear them because they're really comfortable. I said, 'They're comfortable? You're in pain because you're playing in them'" (MLIVE.com, 10/18).

    STARTER PACK: FOXSPORTS.com's Tom Jensen noted sportswear brand Starter will sponsor NASCAR driver Jeffrey Earnhardt for the upcoming Sprint Cup Series races at Talladega and Homestead-Miami, with the relationship "possibly ongoing" for '17. The car will "carry a throwback paint scheme" that is a tribute to his grandfather, Dale Earnhardt (FOXSPORTS.com, 10/17).

    SWIPE LEFT: NEW YORK magazine's Jessica Pressler notes swimmer Ryan Lochte performed an "elaborate proposal" for his fiancee, Playboy model Kayla Reid. The couple have "been together ten months, which may come as a surprise to those who saw Lochte on the Today show in August talking about Tindering in Rio." At the time, Lochte said that he was "under contractual obligation to present himself as single, though he won't say for what company" (NEW YORK magazine, 10/17 issue).

    Print | Tags: Marketing and Sponsorship
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