SBD/March 21, 2013/People and Pop Culture

K.C. Chosen As Host Site For Advanced Screening Of Upcoming Jackie Robinson Biopic

K.C. will be the "host site for the only advance public screenings" of "42," the upcoming film "chronicling the rise" of Baseball HOFer JACKIE ROBINSON, according to Bill Draper of the AP. Actors HARRISON FORD, who portrays late Dodgers GM BRANCH RICKEY, and ANDRE HOLLAND, who portrays late sportswriter WENDELL SMITH, "planned to attend the screenings on April 11." Negro Leagues Baseball Museum President BOB KENDRICK said that proceeds will "benefit" the museum. Other than the official premiere in L.A., the movie will "be shown only in Kansas City prior to its nationwide opening April 12." Kendrick said that the exposure the movie brings to the museum will "be as important as the financial windfall from the advance screenings." Asset management firm Waddell & Reed Exec President THOMAS BUTCH, whose company is one of two primary sponsors of the screenings along with AMC Theatres, said that the $42 tickets "include unlimited concessions, two adult drink tickets and a souvenir bag and has a total value of $70." He added that the movie "is the only movie that will be shown at the BarryWoods 24 complex on the night of the screenings" (AP, 3/21). Butch described the event as "a real coup" for the K.C. market. In K.C., James Fussell reports tickets to the special screenings are "available at 42kansascity.com through April 9 at varying price levels." A $72 ticket includes "VIP seating and a Q&A after the show" led by NBCSports.com columnist JOE POSNANSKI. VIP packages are going from $1,000-25,000 and "include a reception with Ford." Ford will "introduce the film in some, perhaps all, of the theater auditoriums" (K.C. STAR, 3/20).

FILM MAKES IMPRESSION: White Sox Owner JERRY REINSDORF viewed an advanced screening of  the film and said it was “powerful.” He added that Ford has Rickey “down cold.” Reinsdorf: “It just brought back incidents that I remember like it was yesterday.” Reinsdorf was 11 years old when Robinson broke the color barrier, and he said he “absolutely” did not recognize the impact Robinson was making on the game and society. Reinsdorf: “Half my friends were negroes. It wasn’t a big deal. I just wasn’t that aware” (CHICAGOTRIBUNE.com, 3/20).
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