SBD/October 6, 2011/Events and Attractions

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: Unilever Exec Talks About Dove Men Campaign

    Candelino outlines Dove Men's "Journey To Comfort" marketing campaign

    Unilever Marketing Dir of Personal Wash U.S. Rob Candelino kicked off the second day of the IMG Sports Marketing Symposium with a discussion that largely dealt with Dove Men’s “Journey to Comfort” marketing campaign. Candelino explained what the company found in its research that led to the launch of the campaign. “There was one consistent thing, there was a spine that ran through all of our learnings everywhere from everyone we talked to, and it was this: that guys eventually reach a point in their life where they’re figuratively comfortable in their own skin. … It wasn’t just that moment that we wanted to feature. That wasn’t that important to our guys. What they wanted to hear was the journey.” The TV and digital ads first featured Yankees manager Joe Girardi, Cardinals 1B Albert Pujols and former MLBer Andy Pettitte. Dove then launched the campaign during the NCAA tournament and featured Basketball HOFer Magic Johnson, Georgetown men’s basketball coach John Thompson III and former Duke G Bobby Hurley. Candelino talked about the importance of advertising to NCAA viewers. “Forty-two percent of the audience of the NCAA Tournament March Madness is exactly in our wheelhouse. It’s our guy. And this 42%, that’s a lean-forward audience. They’re very much engaged. It’s not passive viewing like many sports are. This is one month of intense focus and they devour data.”

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: Fan Experience A Big Focus For Companies

    Panel discusses ways properties can partner with sponsors to develop new fan experiences

    Today's panel titled "The U.S. Sports Sponsorship Marketplace: Where Is The Growth and Innovation?" focused heavily on developing ways to create new and differentiated experiences for fans, particularly at event sites, in partnership with sponsors. American Express VP/Sports Marketing, Access Strategy & Planning Alex Chang said, "We're always about creating a differentiated experience for fans. In the digital space, though it is harder, and creating a 'velvet rope' is definitely more difficult, particularly given how information is so abundant." Ravens VP/National Sales & Partnerships Kevin Rochlitz discussed how the team boosted fan elements such as town hall-style chats with club owner Steve Bisciotti. Rochlitz: "These kinds of things are big for the fans, and irreplaceable. And our training facility [in Owings Mills, Md.] is a big part of this, too." The evergreen sponsorship issues of measurement and return-on-investment also were discussed in depth. Audience member polling showed that three-fourths of attendees believe the sports industry still does a poor job measuring the efficacy of sponsorships. PepsiCo Senior VP/Global Sports Marketing Jennifer Storms said, "The responsibility [for measurement] lies with both the brand and the property. As a brand you can't rely on the property to tell you about your brand. But they also know that fan the best. It has to be both sides, a partnership." Storms added that data mining, now heavily in vogue across the industry, cannot be an open, unfettered exercise. "You have to tie it to a specific objective. For us, it's less about 'getting lists' than working with somebody and providing a targeted enhancement to a specific fan experience. People will then see the offers coming in as a relevant communication with the brand."

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: Panelists Take A Look At The U.S. Hispanic Marketplace

    Panel says companies need to focus on passion points to better market to Hispanics

    One of the major business challenges discussed at the IMG Sports Marketing Symposium’s panel titled, “Futurecast: A Look at the U.S. Hispanic Marketplace and What the Explosive Population Growth Means for Sports Marketing,” was how companies can focus on Hispanics’ passion for sports to effectively promote their products. Coca-Cola North America Assistant VP/Hispanic Marketing Reinaldo Padua said, “It’s all about the passion points for the consumers. Once you have identified that passion point, you can connect your brand to consumers and have a more emotional connection.” Univision Deportes VP/Marketing Victoria Vitarelli: “If you’re not talking to them directly with a message that really resonates with them, you’re not delivering. Hispanics are going to seek out a message that really resonates with their culture, with their food and with their identity and with their language. Language is an important part of their identity that they’re very proud of.” Yankees Dir of Latino Affairs Manuel Garcia: “When I first started I saw a poll a media outlet had put together that showed close to 50% of Hispanics will try a new product or will buy a new product or will align themselves with a company if that company invests in something that is important to them, whether it is a sport or an event. And for Hispanics, that’s huge.” But MLS CMO Russ Findlay pointed out that tapping into that passion can be difficult. Findlay: “There is a risk sometimes that because of the expansiveness of what available media channels there are, there is the availability, especially for the Hispanic community, for consumers to maintain those passion points from their country of origin. So they may love soccer, but because there is more choice they can maintain their affiliation and they can consume media from outside the U.S. It doesn’t necessarily mean that just because they like soccer and they’re passionate about it, that they automatically like Major League Soccer.”

    CUTTING CORNERS: The executives spoke about cutting corners in a marketing campaign. Vitarelli: “You can’t just take a commercial from XYZ country and adapt it. You’re cutting a corner and you’re not connecting with this multicultural Hispanic American person, which is very different from somebody from a Spanish-speaking country outside of the United States.” Findlay: “If the message isn’t right, then … you’ve lost your money and you’ve certainly lost an opportunity. And even worse than that, you have given an impression as to how you view your product vis-á-vis that consumer and so you’ve just communicated a lot, which is, ‘I don’t understand you and you don’t matter.’ No faster way to tank your brand than to do something like that.”

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: Spending, Marketing-Savvy On Rise Among Top Properties

    Luckman not seeing same sense of concern about economy as several years ago

    Despite the sluggish economy, many of the nation’s top sports and entertainment brands are increasing spending -- though doing so more cautiously and across fewer properties, according to the participants on a panel titled, "Agency Executives Speak Out." CAA Sports' Greg Luckman said, “I’m not finding the same sense of concern or as much caution as a couple of years ago. At the same time, there’s more work being put into the planning cycle.” IMG Consulting Senior VP and Global Managing Dir David Abrutyn: “What certainly has proven true in our business is that sports is working. If you look at the television ratings here in the U.S. for the major sports properties, you look at some of the global properties that are expanding into this market ... what they want to do is find a way to spend money on things that work. They’ve got people activating in football in a way that some people would not have thought given some of the labor challenges.” Octagon Marketing North America President Jeff Shifrin, who jokingly said that it pained him to agree with Abrutyn (and IMG), concurred, saying, “Even through the recession, three or four years ago, we never really saw clients spending less. We actually see them spending a lot differently.” As far as where clients are allotting their budgets, Shifrin added, “Our clients are spending a lot more on the marketing side and activation side, they are not looking for new properties. Much more targeted.” Team Epic Principal Michael Reisman echoed the same: “Our clients are spending more on activation than ever before.”

    SHOWING GROWTH: Abrutyn said brands and properties have grown in terms of marketing know-how. He said, “Properties are also shifting some of their thinking from sponsorship business ... where today they are media companies. Staying with the NFL example, it’s NFL.com, it’s the NFL Network. There are so many other ways they want you to invest in the league. Whereas before it was about the rights fee to them to invest in the league, now it’s about the whole conversation.” Shifrin cited NASCAR as a prime example of a property -- like many others -- that has conducted an internal review and made changes. Shifrin: “I do think the properties are doing a better job. We’re actually seeing people try to do ROI analysis when they come in for the first or second meeting. Ten years ago, we would have never seen that from a property. I think all the properties are, I don’t want to say they’re catching up to where the marketers are, but they’re catching up to where the marketers are.”

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: British Airways Gearing Up For London Games

    Van der Post says British Airways' London Games deal receiving positive feedback

    At the IMG Sports Marketing Symposium, British Airways Managing Dir of Brands & Customer Experience Frank van der Post said the company in its sponsorship of the ‘12 London Games “looked at what we can do to go beyond sports.” This is exemplified in a “Great Britons“ program that gives people a chance to devise a menu to be served on British Airways flights, create artwork to be painted on a dozen planes or produce a film to be shown on planes and at the Opening Ceremony. In addition, British Airways “flew back the (British) Olympic and Paralympics teams from Beijing, and we went as far as to paint the nose of one of our planes gold because we had quite a number of gold medalists there. We received a tremendous amount of publicity out of this ... millions of dollars or pounds in PR ... all over the newspapers.” van der Post said employees have been targeted through a “My 2012” internal goal-setting program that features a website where “thousands of employees have challenged themselves to achieve new heights in ... sports, health and well-being, arts, business and entrepreneurship or community.” The campaign is working externally, as well, said van der Post, citing that 34% of Britons identify British Airways as an Olympic sponsor and that the company is “clearly seen as a very British part of the sponsorship.” He said, “Pride is the most emotive part of our campaigns, and it seems to be working well.”

    PREPARATIONS: van der Post said British Airways in the run-up to the Games will “be running about 120,000 passengers a day, so operationally we have to be ready as well.” He said, “I’ve heard stories of our baggage handlers buying drain pipes the length of pole vaults to see if they could load them in the planes. (We need to) make sure that with Heathrow Airport we have a smooth incoming and outgoing traffic.” van der Post said navigating the red tape involved with Olympic promotions, partnership and general action is “not necessarily easy.” But he added, “You’re also very protected ... which means you’re not going to any rogue guys running around trying to take advantage of it. At the same time, I think you’ve got to build those relationships ... and you’ve got to see how far you can stretch the limits.” He said British Airways will leverage its executive club/frequent flier assets. van der Post: “We will be relaunching the executive club on the 16th of November; all the cards will be rebranded and have the Olympic logo (and) we will have special opportunities for our frequent fliers to earn tickets.” On how the airline will deal with potential ticket-use issues, van der Post said, “We’ve got a fairly robust program in place to make sure that those invited really show up. At the same time, the majority of tickets we have will go back to the public and be used in sales promotions.” British Airways spent $60M on its Olympic sponsorship and van der Post said, “We have 40,000 employees all over the world; if this was something that rallied them together to deliver, then it was well worth it.”

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

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  • IMG Sports Marketing Symposium: CMOs Stress Importance Of Social Media

    Wells says 24 Hour Fitness clubs utilize Facebook to disseminate information to clients

    Much of the discussion in the first panel of IMG’s Sports Marketing Symposium, “Chief Marketing Officers: Navigating the Ever-changing Marketing Landscape,” focused on how to use social media as a cost-effective way to interact with consumers. Scotts Miracle-Gro CMO Jim Lyski said, “Social to me is really just about enabling word of mouth on a large scale. ... If I can figure out a way to really facilitate word-of-mouth marketing via social, that’s where it pays off for us and that’s where we start seeing the performance on the shelf in our retailers.” 24 Hour Fitness CMO Tony Wells said, “We’ll have a Facebook page for every club, and we’re really viewing that as their local newspaper. I think there’s a trend to continue to go local and make that communication very individual. For us, it’s a tool for our clubs to keep their members informed of what’s going on.” Samsung Electronics America CMO Ralph Santana said for the ’12 London Games the company will launch “a program that’s called The Genome Project.” Santana: “It’s a Facebook app that will ... literally build for you a family tree that will show you how you are connected to different Olympic athletes. ... It was grounded in this insight that people really want to know how they’re connected to the Olympic movement, but they don’t really have the means to understand what that connection may be.” Santana said to mitigate company costs, Samsung on its website has “a lot of social tools that enable consumers to talk to each other, post questions, talk to experts and literally solve their own problems. ... So instead of calling the call center, which might cost $6 to resolve an issue, typically an e-mail resolution of the same issue might cost us 10 cents or a chat room might cost us up to 50 cents.”

    I'LL HAVE MY PEOPLE CALL YOUR PEOPLE: The executives also talked about the value of using a sports agency. Santana: “There are three criteria: its insights, ideas and executions. So can you deliver the insights? If you can then you’re a valued agency. Can you translate that into an idea? Then ultimately, how do you execute it?” Lyski: “The primary reason we use them is because I’m not going to be able to develop and grow a talent base that can come anywhere close to what I’m doing with Wasserman (Media Group). So we use them for strategy and then actual event execution.” Lyski spoke of how the goals for using sports branding and social media are identical. Lyski: “You pick the sports that are going to flesh the brand out in a more personal way with an end consumer, and that’s the way we’re leveraging the social vehicles.”

    See a full agenda for the conference, and get highlights and updates from the sessions via SBJ/SBD's running blog and Twitter feed.

    Print | Tags: Events and Attractions
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