SBD/Issue 151/Sponsorships, Advertising & Marketing

Tiger Merchandise Still Selling For High Prices In Store, Online

Woods Memorabilia Still
Selling Online

Tiger Woods merchandise both in stores and online has been "selling pretty much in line with previous prices," according to Darren Rovell of CNBC.com. Woods this week is "autographing new product for Upper Deck." The company is selling "autographed range balls hit by Tiger for $499, autograph[ed] black Nike hats for $999 and autographed golf cleats for $1,399." Sports memorabilia firm Tri-Star Productions President Jeff Rosenberg said, "I was really surprised that prices have held up. We charted it. I had buyers out there looking to capitalize on a drop and get some good deals. But there was nothing to capitalize on. From retail to eBay to other dealers, there just wasn’t any discounting." Rosenberg said that "one of the reasons why the price hasn’t dropped is that there is a belief that Woods would bounce back on the course" (CNBC.com, 4/19).

YOU RAISE ME UP? ADWEEK's Mark Dolliver reports for "all the attention lavished on sports stars, athletes have limited powers when it comes to influencing consumers' purchase decisions." A majority of respondents to an AdweekMedia/Harris Poll claimed to be "unmotivated by various sorts of athlete-endorsers." Ten percent said that a football player would "most motivate them to buy a brand," followed by baseball players (7%), basketball players (6%) and golfers (4%). Respondents in the 18-34 demo were "more likely than their elders to say they would be most moved by a basketball player's brand endorsement" at 9%, compared to 4% for 35-44, 6% for 45-54 and 3% for 55-plus. Baseball players "rose into double digits only among the 45-54s," with 10% saying that "they'd be most swayed by such an athlete's endorsement" (ADWEEK, 4/19 issue).

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