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RYDER CUP EARNS 6.3/15 SUNDAY RATING; MILLER IN THE EYE

          NBC earned record overnight ratings for its coverage of
     the Ryder Cup.  Saturday's coverage earned a 4.9/14 and
     Sunday's coverage earned a 6.3/15.  Sunday's action was up
     62% over the '97 final-day overnight of a 3.9/13 (THE
     DAILY). In Boston, Jim Baker reported that Saturday's 4.9/14
     overnight included a 9.2 in West Palm Beach, FL, a 7.3 in
     Providence and 7.2 in Boston (BOSTON HERALD, 9/27). 
          JOHNNY'S GARDEN: Many members of the U.S. Ryder Cup
     team criticized NBC golf analyst Johnny Miller for being too
     critical of their performance on Friday and Saturday.  Near
     the end of yesterday's broadcast, Miller said, "I try to
     call them like I see them.  I never lost faith that the
     United States could pull this thing and there's nobody that
     pulls harder for the U.S. than I do.  But I got to call them
     the way I see them and sometimes the players don't always
     love my idea of announcing.  So, I try to represent the
     people out there and represent the game and those are the
     people I try to answer to" (NBC, 9/26).  USA TODAY's Rudy
     Martzke writes that "rarely has an announcer been the focus
     of such venom from players" (USA TODAY, 9/27). In Chicago,
     Skip Bayless gives Miller "credit ... for having the guts to
     say the Americans weren't showing any guts" (CHICAGO
     TRIBUNE, 9/27).  In N.Y., Phil Mushnick writes that while
     Miller is "often brutally frank, he works only for the
     viewer, a rarity among golfcasters" (N.Y. POST, 9/27).  In
     Richmond, Jerry Lindquist: "Miller is the best.  He doesn't
     look the other way" (RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH, 9/27).  In
     Toronto, Rob Longley writes that for three days, Miller
     "made up for the weak rah-rah commentary" from his partners. 
     Longley added that NBC's weekend telecasts "succeeded in
     spite of itself.  The natural drama and strong performance
     by Miller carried the show" (TORONTO SUN, 9/27).
          NBC COVERAGE: In Atlanta, Prentis Rogers writes that
     NBC "effectively captured every moment" of the event (ATL.
     CONSTITUTION, 9/27). In Houston, David Barron writes that
     NBC's six-plus hours of coverage "was a tape to put away in
     the vaults for future reference" (HOUSTON CHRONICLE, 9/27). 
     Martzke gives NBC an A- only for missing post-match European
     player interviews Sunday (USA TODAY, 9/27).
          WHERE DID THEY FIND THOSE SHIRTS? In Orlando, Jerry
     Greene finds it "amazing" that the U.S. team had a $275,000
     clothing budget "and bought those comical shirts out of the
     trunk of somebody's car" (ORLANDO SENTINEL, 9/27).  FSN's
     Keith Olbermann, on the U.S. team's shirts worn Sunday: "Oh,
     these are team shirts, as opposed to some kind of fashion
     Love Canal kind of disaster" (FSN, 9/26).  ESPN's Rich
     Eisen: "What's up with the shirts?" (ESPN, "SportsCenter",
     9/26). In Calgary, Eric Francis: "I can say the only thing
     more obnoxious than the [Americans'] behaviour yesterday was
     their wardrobe" (CALGARY SUN, 9/27).
          BOFFO WEEKEND: Greater Boston Convention & Visitors
     Bureau officials feel the event may bring in more than the
     estimated $150M economic windfall from the six-day
     tournament.  President Patrick Moscaritolo: "We may do
     better than the original estimate.  I'm sure on merchandise
     sales we will."  Some vendors reported selling 100% of their
     inventory, and PGA officials "had indicated sales were at
     record levels" (BOSTON HERALD, 9/27)....The BOSTON HERALD's
     Michael Lasalandra wrote that while some "complained about
     the traffic in and around The Country Club [in Brookline]
     and the complicated system of trains and shuttle busses
     needed to get to the course," some said the "transportation
     situation is smooth, compared to Valderrama" (BOSTON HERALD,
     9/25).  Some felt that with attendance exceeding 30,000,
     there "were simply too many people on a too small plot of
     land" (AP, 9/26).  On Friday, nearly 60% of the 40,000 in
     attendance took MA public transportation to the event (AP,
     9/25)....FSN's Keith Olbermann, on the U.S. team's
     celebration after Justin Leonard's match-winning putt:
     "Something amazing was won, but just as assuredly something
     amazing was lost when his teammates and their wives stormed
     the green. ... Congrats Ryder Cup, you're no longer a
     tradition.  Now you're a marketing scheme" (FSN, 9/26). 

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