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  • BRONCOS REACH DEAL ON LEASE BUYOUT AT MILE HIGH STADIUM

              The Broncos "have a deal that will let them leave" Mile
         High Stadium, contingent on voter approval November 3 of a
         $260M subsidy of a proposed $350M stadium, according to Ann
         Imse of the ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS.  Imse: "For something more
         than $40 million, according to the deal, the Broncos can
         walk away from what they call the worst lease in the NFL." 
         To escape the lease, the team will buy out concessionaires
         at Mile High, pay off city bonds tied to a stadium seat tax,
         and pay 25% of the cost of street, utilities and other
         improvements related to the new stadium.  Both Mile High and
         McNichols Sports Arena will be torn down.  In return, Denver
         will sell the 80-acre Mile High site to the six-county
         stadium district for $10.  The city will get the land back
         at the end of the 25-year deal (ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, 8/7).  
    
    

    Print | Tags: Denver Broncos, Facilities, NFL
  • PNC PONIES UP $30M FOR NAMING RIGHTS TO PIRATES' NEW PARK

              The Pirates and Pittsburgh-based PNC Bank yesterday
         announced a 20-year marketing alliance under which the new
         home of the Pirates will be named PNC Park when it opens in
         2001.  Under the naming-rights agreement, PNC will pay
         approximately $1.5M a year through the 2020 season.  The
         bank has also negotiated a separate marketing agreement that
         provides several marketing, advertising and merchandising
         opportunities, including the exclusive right to offer
         financial services at the ballpark (Pirates).  
              IMAGE BOOSTER FOR PNC: In Pittsburgh, Tom Barnes
         reports that PNC Chair Thomas O'Brien and PNC President/
         Pittsburgh Operations Sy Holzer said the new agreement
         "includes a national marketing and promotional component
         that will help PNC publicize its name on a wider scale and
         better compete in the world of institutional investing and
         asset management."  O'Brien: "We'll get something like a
         billion-and-a-half impressions of PNC a year."  O'Brien
         added that PNC's investment will also "bolster its growth in
         the Pittsburgh region," where it employs 8,100 people and
         has added 3,400 workers since '95.  The naming rights will
         cost PNC $30M over the life of the deal, and it will also
         pay another fee for the marketing deal (POST GAZETTE, 8/7).
              CAN YOU STOP THE INSANITY? MLB Commissioner Bud Selig
         was asked several questions yesterday about MLB's economic
         disparity at the PNC news conference, and in Pittsburgh,
         columnist Ron Cook writes that "it's really depressing when
         baseball's commissioner offers no real hope for any fiscal
         sanity prevailing in the future" (POST GAZETTE, 8/7).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Anheuser Busch, Facilities, MLB, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • ROSE GARDEN RAISES THE BAR ON WHEELCHAIR SEATING

              The Rose Garden "will have better wheelchair seating
         than almost any other sports arena in the country thanks to
         a lawsuit settlement announced Wednesday," according to
         Ashbel Green of the Portland OREGONIAN.  According to the
         agreement, arena officials will build 101 elevated
         wheelchair seats throughout the arena so that users can see
         the game when other spectators stand up in front of them. 
         During Blazer games and other sporting events, arena
         officials will hold all 101 seats open until the day of the
         game, but will sell the seats to the general public if they
         aren't purchased by wheelchair users. The changes "should be
         in effect" by the start of this season (OREGONIAN, 8/6).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Facilities
  • WHEN YOU'RE DOWNTOWN: RAVENS STADIUM OPENS TOMORROW NIGHT

              In a front-page piece in today's WASHINGTON POST, Heath
         & Goodman report that the "politically divisive, decade-long
         quest" to bring pro football to downtown Baltimore concludes
         tomorrow night, when the Ravens host the Bears in the first
         preseason game in their new stadium (WASHINGTON POST, 8/7).
         Ravens VP David Modell tells Don Pierson of the CHICAGO
         TRIBUNE that revenues from new, publicly-financed stadiums
         "separate the men from the boys in this sport."  But Modell
         said the team will not make a $70M profit this year from the
         new stadium, as is widely reported: "We're receiving $70
         million and promptly handing over 64 percent to players. 
         You have a business to run" (CHICAGO TRIBUNE, 8/7).  In MD,
         John Eisenberg writes that the stadium is a "splendid place,
         no doubt, as well it should be for what it cost."  But,
         noting the high upper-level, he writes, "if your seats are
         up there, you'd better bring a Sherpa" (BALT. SUN, 7/8).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Baltimore Ravens, Chicago Bears, Facilities
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