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NET RESULTS: THE U.S. OPEN IS THE PLACE TO BE -- AND BE SEEN

          The U.S. Open "has become the social and sporting event
     of the New York summer scene, generating a whopping $130
     million in revenue and broadcasts in 175 countries,"
     according to Stefan Fatsis of the WALL STREET JOURNAL. 
     Fatsis: "But don't be fooled.  Outside the Open's opulent
     new stadium, U.S. tennis is still fighting to reclaim its
     glory days of the 1970s.  Even with a new spark in
     popularity for the women's circuit, pro tennis is stuck in
     the qualifying rounds of big-league sports."  Many industry
     execs say that part of the "problem" is that tennis "remains
     fractured," as the USTA runs the U.S. Open, while other
     events on the ATP and WTA Tours are independently owned and
     operated.  One of the other problems is "simply too much
     tennis," as too many tournaments fight over the top players. 
     But both the men's and women's tours "say they're trying to
     reform themselves, and work out better deals with the
     networks and cable" TV. Fatsis: "Without consistent national
     TV exposure, advertisers don't see a reason to put money
     anywhere in tennis but the prestigious Grand Slam events." 
     CBS Sports President Sean McManus adds that there "hasn't
     been a strong enough advertiser base."  But at the U.S.
     Open, "such concerns couldn't be further from center court." 
     Advantage Int'l President Phillip de Picciotto: "The Open is
     a showcase.  The scale is just grander than it's ever been. 
     And the public has responded" (WALL STREET JOURNAL, 8/28).
          LOVE ON THE STREETS IN THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN: At the 
     women's Pilot Pen Int'l in New Haven, announced attendance
     for the first four days was 27,140.  Through the first three
     days, the announced attendance of 20,507 was more than the
     men's tournament drew in its first three day and night
     sessions last week.  But in Hartford, Greg Garber writes
     that while the event is doing well "on paper," there "seems
     ... to be a sizable gap between the announced attendance and
     the actual number of people in the seats" (HARTFORD COURANT,
     8/28).  Also in Hartford, Lori Riley profiles former WTA
     Tour CEO Anne Worcester, who now runs APW Sports and is a
     consultant to the women's event (HARTFORD COURANT, 8/28). 

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ATP, CBS, Events and Attractions, USTA, Viacom

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