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DOCTORS ENDURE KNICKS AND BRUISES OVER FORMATION OF PTP

          While Knicks' team doctor Dr. Norman Scott helped form
     a LLC called the Association of Professional Team Physicians
     (PTP) over a year ago, he "angered" Knicks execs earlier
     this year when he "seemed to trade on his authority over the
     fate" of Knicks C Patrick Ewing, according to Nick
     Paumgarten of the N.Y. OBSERVER.  Scott, who has now
     enlisted more than 70 doctors from teams in the NBA, NHL,
     MLB and WNBA to join PTP, gave an interview to the N.Y.
     Times, discussing Ewing's playing injury "in some detail,"
     and Paumgarten writes that what "angered" the Knicks was
     Scott's "thinly veiled use" of Ewing "as bait."  Paumgarten:
     "Although they deny it, Dr. Scott and the numerous other pro
     team doctors involved in the venture seem to be trading on
     their relationships with their teams to build a brand name
     for themselves.  And the brand is devoted, in large part, to
     generating profits.  For that reason, many doctors in the
     sports medicine establishment are wary of [PTP] and
     skeptical of its intentions."  But MSG President Dave
     Checketts, who is a co-founder of PTP and a member of its
     four-man board, said he was "unaware of any tension" over
     the Ewing incident (N.Y. OBSERVER, 6/1).
          DR. BILL: Paumgarten reports that "many team doctors"
     in N.Y. are "wrinkling their noses at the scent of
     commercial gain" posed by PTP and "many" of them, including
     "some of the top names in the sports medicine business,"
     have declined Scott's invitation to join PTP.  But the PTP's
     members have gone to "great lengths to downplay the profit
     angle and portray their association" as one committed to the
     principles of education and research.  PTP will begin to
     market "sportcare" products and plans to accredit sports
     clinics and develop a product stamp of approval.  PTP will
     shortly introduce a line of orthopedic supports and braces
     under the brand name Stardox (N.Y. OBSERVER, 6/1).

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