SBD/5/Sponsorships Advertising Marketing

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  • INSIGHT'S COPPER BOWL SPONSORSHIP NOT A FAN FAVORITE?

              AZ-based Insight Enterprises "has absorbed its share of
         barbs in the media, and jabs from the public" for renaming
         the Copper Bowl the Insight.com Bowl, according to Russ
         Wiles of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.  But Insight Chair Eric Crown
         defended the deal and said his company's sponsorship keeps
         the bowl "financially viable beyond 2000," as Insight will
         pay "roughly" $1M a year for approximately five years.  With
         the deal, Insight has two goals: increase its brand-name
         exposure on a national scale and to boost awareness of its
         Internet retailing channel (ARIZONA REPUBLIC, 12/27).
    
    

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  • MARKETPLACE ROUND-UP

              Among BUSINESS WEEK's "Products to Watch" in '98 is
         Tiger Woods' new Nike golf apparel line, with shirts, shorts
         and hats to roll out this spring.  A national campaign
         begins in March (BUSINESS WEEK, 1/12 issue)....At the FedEx
         Orange Bowl, Terry Pledger won $1M in a Gillette-sponsored
         pregame contest by throwing a football ten yards through a
         30-inch circular target.  Pledger became Gillette's first
         winner in 16 competitions since '93 (ST. PETERSBURG TIMES,
         1/3)....Emmitt Smith is featured in a new Right Guard ad
         campaign which debuted during the Orange Bowl.  Smith, on
         using the deodorant: "There were times when we (the Cowboys)
         stunk up the field so bad we needed something to get rid of
         the odor" (DALLAS MORNING NEWS, 1/1)....USA TODAY's
         Elizabeth Snead looked at "what's truly hip and happening
         for '98."  Among what's "Out" for '98 was Nike and women's
         basketball, while adidas and women's soccer were "In" for
         '98 (Elizabeth Snead, USA TODAY, 12/31).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Dallas Cowboys, FedEx, Nike, Washington Nationals
  • NIKE THINKS IT CAN, IT THINKS IT CAN, IT THINKS IT CAN...

              On January 1, Nike debuted its new ad campaign, "I
         Can," created by Wieden & Kennedy.  Nike VP/USA Marketing
         Bob Wood, on "I Can": "At a time when cynicism in sports is
         at an all-time high, 'I Can' is an effort to return to a
         focus on the positive.  It reflects the deep emotional
         connection that people have with sports" (Nike).  AD AGE's
         Jeff Jensen reports that W&K currently is at work on a
         different "I Can" execution, "featuring high-profile Nike
         endorsers talking about what sports mean to them."  Goodby,
         Silverstein & Partners will also "contribute creative work"
         on the new slogan, but Jensen adds Nike "didn't indicate
         when Goodby's first 'I Can' work will break" (AD AGE, 1/4).
              TAKING THE EDGE OFF? In Portland, Jeff Manning called
         the new campaign "an enormous gamble" since Nike advertising
         "is consistently ranked among the most effective and popular
         in the country."  Manning added that with the new spots,
         Nike "is in the odd position of attempting to focus
         attention away from many of the problems in sports that the
         shoe companies are seen as having helped create," and that
         Nike hopes its new campaign "will remind consumers of all
         that is good about sports" (OREGONIAN, 12/30).  On CNN's
         "Moneyline," Jan Hopkins said, "Nike says the message aims
         to play down the growing view that athletes are spoiled, an
         image that Nike helped create by lavishing multimillion
         dollar shoe contracts on pro athletes" (CNN, 12/30).  In
         N.Y., Richard Wilner wrote that while "'Just Do It' will go
         down in ad history as one of the all-time greats, experts
         say it was time to hang it up."  Wall Street analysts also
         "applauded the move."  Avrett, Free & Ginsberg Chair Frank
         Ginsberg said Nike "needed something less aggressive." 
         Black & Co.'s Jennifer Black Groves said the new TV spots
         "will strive to forge a new closeness between the company,
         athletes and wannabe athletes" (N.Y. POST, 12/31).  The AP's
         Bob Baum wrote the new slogan "is partly an attempt to
         offset a rather glum year for Nike" (AP, 12/31).  Nike USA
         Marketing Ad Dir Chris Zimmerman: "Obviously, the market has
         slowed.  That's a time when we look to advertising to play a
         bigger role in driving sales" (N.Y. TIMES, 12/31). 
              END OF AN ERA: In Chicago, Jim Kirk wrote that after
         nine years of using "Just Do It," a phrase "that has become
         a part of American popular culture," Nike changed "one of
         the most enduring -- and at one time most successful --
         marketing slogans of the decade" (CHICAGO TRIBUNE, 12/31). 
         "Just Do It" will not "completely disappear" and "will
         continue" as Nike's theme overseas (N.Y. TIMES, 12/31).  
    
    

    Print | Tags: Nike, Time Warner, Wieden Kennedy
  • N.Y./N.J. TEAMS WANT THE FULL SCOOP ON WHO BEATS THE WIZ

              The Knicks, Rangers and Mets "all expressed concern"
         about the "roughly" $10M in advertising that "could go up in
         smoke because of the financial troubles" at NJ-based Nobody
         Beats the Wiz, according to Richard Wilner of the N.Y. POST.
    
         Wilner wrote that the teams "sought some reassurance from
         the troubled" chain about its sponsor deals, "but came away
         empty-handed."  Nobody Beats the Wiz's Restructuring Officer
         Richard Sebastio: "We have an extremely limited budget for
         advertising over the next four weeks and no commitments or
         decisions have been made."  Wilner added that the area teams
         are "mobilizing to line up possible replacement advertisers"
         should the Wiz, not return (N.Y. POST, 12/23).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Cablevision, New York Knicks, New York Mets
  • OLYMPIC SPEEDSKATERS SLOWED IN THEIR SEARCH FOR COLD CASH

              U.S. Olympic speedskating coach Gerard Kemkers said his
         team "doesn't have any cash-paying sponsors," according to
         USA TODAY's Tom Weir.  Kemkers: "We would be happy with
         $100,000."  Weir added the U.S. Speedskating Federation has
         "deals for apparel, equipment, engineering and health
         services, but none that gives hard cash directly to
         athletes."  Some speedskaters get money from USOC "funding
         and connections to in-line skating" (USA TODAY, 1/2).
    
    

    Print | Tags: USOC
  • REEBOK TABS BERLIN CAMERON & PARTNERS FOR RUNNING CATEGORY

              Reebok has "further expanded" its ad agency roster by
         naming NY-based Berlin Cameron & Partners to handle its
         running category, which includes shoes, apparel and
         equipment, according to the N.Y. TIMES.  The assignment,
         with billings estimated "as much as" $30M, was most recently
         inactive.  Berlin Cameron joins Reebok's "lead creative
         agency," MA-based Heater Advertising (N.Y. TIMES, 1/2).
    
    

    Print | Tags: Reebok
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