SBD/4/Olympics

Print All
  • OLYMPIC BILLBOARDS SENT PACKING BY FEDERAL JUDGE

         The sponsors of the '96 Games in Atlanta were dealt a
    "marketing setback" as a federal judge refused to allow a city
    ordinance that would have permitted "as many as 25 gargantuan
    billboards" in the Atlanta area, according to Lyle Harris of the
    ATLANTA CONSTITUTION.  The order is the result of a lawsuit filed
    by one of the city's largest billboard owners, Outdoor Systems,
    Inc.  The megasigns would have been as tall as 90 feet, and as
    wide as 40 feet.  The ordinance would have also stipulated 80% of
    the signs be Olympic-related, with the remaining 20% retained for
    advertising logos, symbols, or slogans.  ACOG officials were
    instrumental in helping city officials craft the ordinance in
    order to satisfy sponsors who paid as much as $40M for
    sponsorship rights.  The large signs would have overshadowed
    competitors' smaller billboards that could be present in Atlanta
    during the Olympics.  U.S. District Judge William O'Kelley found
    the ordinance in violation of free speech rights and equal
    protections guarantees.  Outdoor Systems' Randy Romig:  "I'm
    concerned about the image of the outdoor advertising industry,
    and I thought the size of these signs was outrageous" (ATLANTA
    CONSTITUTION, 5/4).
    

    Print | Tags: Olympics
  • TICKET REQUESTS FAR IN EXCESS OF ORGANIZERS EXPECTATIONS

         ACOG officials report that after three days, ticket requests
    are nearly double what they expected for the entire first week.
    ACOG has received 34,000 completed order forms.  ACOG Managing
    Dir for Games Services Scott Anderson stated that "publicity and
    a pent-up demand for everything Olympic" is spurring the early
    tide.  ACOG CFO Patrick Glisson reported that ACOG has revenue
    commitments on 72% of the overall $1.6B budget, not counting
    revenue from the first two days of ticket sales.  ACOG still has
    $438M to go to break even.  Price Waterhouse's Robbie Pound, who
    handles ACOG's books:  "Given the level that the ticket
    processing system worked (Tuesday), we can take some comfort in
    the fact that it's the largest single line-item left on the
    revenue side" (Turner & Harris, ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, 5/4).
    

    Print | Tags: Olympics
Video Powered By - Castfire CMS Powered By - Sitecore

Report a Bug