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  • BREWERS EVALUATE THEIR OPTIONS AFTER LOTTERY LOSS

         With the defeat this week of a sports lottery to help fund a
    new stadium in Milwaukee, the Brewers are now left with a
    "handful of alternatives that each carry their own set of
    political obstacles."  They are:  A wholesale tax on petroleum
    stored in Milwaukee, some temporary local sales tax increase, or
    tapping Indian gaming revenue.  Each option was weighed by
    various officials this week.  According to Milwaukee County Exec
    F. Thomas Ament, a 2-cent-per-gallon petroleum fee on gas stored
    in Milwaukee could raise about $20M a year -- "about the cost of
    constructing the new baseball stadium."  On the other hand,
    officials in surrounding counties have "uniformly rejected" the
    idea of a regional sales tax hike.  The use of Indian gaming
    revenues, is getting mixed reactions, including an "immediate"
    dismissal by a spokesperson for Gov. Tommy Thompson (Gilbert &
    Rinard, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, 4/5).
         VOTE FALLOUT:  In Milwaukee, Craig Gilbert notes many
    reasons for the lottery's "landslide" defeat.  According to
    lobbyist/lottery opponent Mike Birkley, "There was a strong anti-
    Milwaukee, but not anti-Brewer, sentiment."  But state Sen. Gary
    Drzewiecki said "voters were fed up with gambling and fed up with
    major-league baseball after the strike" (MILWAUKEE JOURNAL
    SENTINEL, 4/5).  Brewers Owner Bud Selig feels the team must
    continue to work with the community to find a way to finance a
    stadium.  Selig:  "In January, the business community announced
    an aggressive and significant ticket commitment.  The Brewers
    have committed $60 million to $90 million (in rent and other
    contributions) toward a new ballpark.  It's important that we now
    further this partnership and formulate the right financing
    package" (Tom Haudricourt, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, 4/5).
    

    Print | Tags: Anheuser Busch, Facilities, Milwaukee Brewers
  • CINCINNATI MAY LOOK FOR FIRM TO MANAGE STADIUM

         Cincinnati City Manager John Shirey is expected to recommend
    a plan "within weeks" to search for a private firm to manage
    Riverfront Stadium.  Councilman Phil Heimlich, who suggested the
    same idea last year, "was pleased":  "It's exactly the direction
    the city needs to be going" (Laura Goldberg, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,
    4/7).
    

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  • DETAILS ON BANK ONE'S $132 MILLION ARIZONA INVESTMENT

         Bank One's $66M, 30-year deal to name the Diamondbacks' new
    retractable dome stadium "Bank One Ballpark" is joined by a $66M,
    30-year radio and television advertising and promotional contract
    with the team, according to the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.  Under the
    terms of the naming-rights deal, Bank One will pay $1M for the
    first year and an additional 5% per year for the next 29 years.
    The Maricopa County Stadium District, the taxpayer-funded body
    that is paying for the park, will receive $325,000 the first year
    and an additional 5% for 30 years, with the team receiving the
    remainder of the payment.  Diamondbacks Owner Jerry Colangelo
    says the move will allow the team to remain competitive on the
    field.  Colangelo added that "baseball purists who might object
    to the commercial name of the stadium should confine their
    interests to the game, not the management of it":  "In order to
    deliver that product of the game itself, you need to build venues
    that have the opportunity to pay for it."  Bank One CEO Richard
    Lehmann said that $1M is not a lot of money to spend compared
    with the millions the bank spends each year on advertising:
    "This is going to help my colleagues in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky
    and so on and so forth, because Bank One's name is going to be
    talked about on a national basis" (Eric Miller, ARIZONA REPUBLIC,
    4/6).
    

    Print | Tags: Arizona Diamondbacks, Facilities
  • KIEL CENTER REACHES DEAL WITH TICKETS NOW

         The Kiel Center and Tickets Now have signed a "peace
    agreement" which calls for the ticket agency to continue as the
    official ticket provider for the arena "for a minimum of three
    years."  Blues hockey, St. Louis Univ. basketball, concerts and
    other shows are all included in the new deal.  The deal comes in
    the wake of last year's "threat" by Kiel Center Partners, the
    group who owns and operates the arena, and Contemporary
    Productions Inc., the region's biggest producer of concerts and
    other events, to form their own ticket agency after they were
    outbid in their effort to buy Tickets Now.  According to Kiel's
    new President and CEO, William Haviluk, "it did not make sense to
    start [our] own ticket agency" (Adam Goodman, ST. LOUIS POST-
    DISPATCH, 4/7).
    

    Print | Tags: Facilities, St. Louis Blues
  • WARRIORS MAY NOT ACCOMPANY GIANTS TO NEW COMPLEX

         In a move that has "dimmed" San Francisco Mayor Frank
    Jordan's hopes that the Warriors will join the Giants at a
    Mission Bay entertainment complex, Warriors attorney Robin Bagget
    has told Jordan that a Rincon Hill location "is the only
    acceptable site in the city for a new arena."  If the Warriors
    decide to move, however, team spokesperson David Looman says any
    decision on Rincon Hill "was on hold for now."  Jordan backs the
    Giants' plan to organize an entertainment district in Mission Bay
    including a baseball stadium, music and TV studios, virtual
    reality exhibits, specialty theaters and shops, and possibly an
    arena.  Giants Exec VP Larry Baer:  "They can come along if they
    want, but there's no linkage in order for us to go forward with
    the ballpark" (Gerald Adams, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, 4/7).
    

    Print | Tags: Facilities, Golden State Warriors
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