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  • COMPANY SHOWS NOSE FOR EXPOSURE AS JERRY RICE BREATHES EASY

         ABC cameras caught Jerry Rice on "Monday Night Football"
    wearing "what appeared to be a Band-Aid on his proboscis [nose]."
    But it was a Breathe Right nasal strip, made by the company CNS,
    that is "fast developing a following among players."  Breathe
    Right was designed to clear up nighttime nasal congestion and
    reduce snoring, but with "pro-football exposure, it might not be
    long before amateur players emulate their idols and start
    snapping up the devices at $4.99 a ten pack."  So far, Wall
    Street may be recognizing that CNS in Minneapolis "may have a hit
    on its hands," since after Monday's exposure from Rice, CNS
    shares rose 11% -- although "a still puny 59,700 shares."  But
    investors should not "blow their life savings on CNS," since the
    device could attract imitators, and CNS is being sued by a man
    "alleging he has a claim on revenue to Breathe Right" (William
    Power, WALL STREET JOURNAL, 12/1).
    

    Print | Tags: ABC, Walt Disney
  • DIGITIZED SHAQ ATTACKS MULTIMEDIA

         In this morning's USA TODAY, Mike Snider reports that
    Shaquille O'Neal "has transcended the basketball court to become
    a multimedia superstar."  His first video game, "Shaq-Fu," from
    Electronic Arts, just hit the shelves, and his second rap album,
    "Shaq Fu: da Return," has logged-in at No. 25 on this week's
    BILLBOARD R&B chart.  The video game, which retails for $69.95,
    transports Shaq "into a magical, mystical martial arts world"
    (USA TODAY, 12/1).
         HOME IMPROVEMENT:  "The Nintendo and Sega game systems
    plugged into TV sets in four out of 10 U.S. homes already are
    targeted for retirement, although they're only 5 years old,"
    according to Joseph Gelmis in today's N.Y. NEWSDAY.  In the face
    of new technology and the threat of competition from digital CD,
    Sega "has been extending the life of its aging Genesis system
    with major big-bucks implants" and developing a CD-based game,
    while Nintendo -- which "has balked at adopting the CD game
    format" -- is preparing to launch a 64-bit cartridge based game
    (N.Y. NEWSDAY, 12/1).
    

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  • SALES OF SPORTING GOODS GROW IN PACIFIC STATES

         Sporting goods store sales surged between 1987 and 1992 in
    WA, OR, CA, AK, and HI, according to the National Sporting Goods
    Association.  An analysis of recent retail trade census data
    shows that sales in full-line sports stores and specialty sports
    shops jumped from $2.09B in 1987 to $3.06B in 1992.  Thomas
    Doyle, NSGA Dir of Information and Research:  "The 46% growth for
    the Pacific states was four times greater than the 11 percent
    population growth for the region in the same time frame."  Other
    study highlights:  the total number of sporting goods stores in
    the Pacific region rose 14% in the same period, from 3,528 to
    4,037; the number of specialty shops increased 18%, while the
    number of full-line stores increased 7%; among full-line stores,
    1992 sales per store were $1.08M, among specialty shops sales
    were $627,000 (National Sporting Goods Association).
    

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  • SPORT SUMMIT SURVEYS EXECUTIVES ON LABOR DISPUTES

         According to a survey of 20 sports industry executives
    conducted by the International Sport Summit, the NFL and NBA
    appear to be the biggest beneficiaries of the MLB and NHL work
    stoppages.  When asked which sports or entertainment categories
    have the most to gain from the current labor-management
    conflicts, respondents said the NFL has the most to gain,
    followed by the NBA, college football, figure skating, and the
    Olympics.  Craig Tartasky, Exec Dir of the International Sport
    Summit:  "With the silent passing of the Fall classic and the NHL
    not skating, football was poised to fill a void.  As the
    beneficiary of the strike, Fox Television is the true winner thus
    far.  The question remains though, would Fox have paid more for
    the rights to the NFL if they had known of the strikes and would
    the NFL have demanded more?"  The 1995 International Sport Summit
    will be held January 17-18 in New York (Sport Summit).
    

    Print | Tags: MLB, NBA, News Corp./Fox, NFL, NHL
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