SBD/3/Sports Media

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  • MEDIA NOTES

         The WALL STREET JOURNAL is set to launch a weekend sports
    section.  One source at the JOURNAL:  "Let's face it, sports is
    really just a business these days" (Neal Travis, N.Y. POST,
    11/3)....La Cadena Deportiva Prime Ticket has signed a five-year
    agreement with New Forever, Corp. to televise eight tournaments
    and more than 1,000 league matches from Brazil, Columbia, Ecuador
    and Peru in the U.S. (Prime Ticket)....Midwest Sports Channel has
    signed an agreement to air a minimum of 38 CBA games during the
    '94-'95 season (GOULD MEDIA, 11/2)....Fox gained another large
    market over NBC when the NFL placed Carolina in Fox's NFC West
    and Jacksonville in the NBC's AFC Central.  Charlotte is the No.
    28 media market, while Jacksonville is No. 55 (Rudy Martzke, USA
    TODAY, 11/3)....ESPN's Bob Ley received the Sports Journalism
    Award for Sports Media as host of ESPN's "Outside the Lines" at
    the Northeastern Univ. Sports and Society Hall of Fame dinner
    (Mult., 11/3).
    

    Print | Tags: ESPN, NBC, News Corp./Fox, NFL, Media, Walt Disney
  • NCAA WANTS PAPERS TO STOP RUNNING BETTING LINES

         The NCAA may prohibit newspapers that publish college sports
    betting lines from covering the basketball Final Four.  The idea
    will be discussed at the NCAA Div. I Men's Basketball Committee
    meetings this month in New York.  SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS Executive
    Sports Editor David Tepps says the betting lines "are more than
    merely gambling information; they give the fan an idea of how
    teams match up."  Tepps: "I would hate to be blackmailed like
    that by the NCAA" (SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, 11/3).
    

    Print | Tags: NCAA, Media
  • PRIMESTAR PARTNERS UPSET OVER NO DEAL WITH NFL

         Cable operators that make up Primestar Partners "are furious
    at the NFL for not cutting a deal with the direct broadcast
    satellite venture."  John Malone, President and CEO of TCI, a
    partner in Primestar: "For them to make an exclusive deal with
    DirectTV makes no economic sense."  DirectTV, owned by GM,
    recently signed a deal with the league allowing them to be the
    exculsive DBS supplier to sell NFL games to customers.  One cable
    exec in the Primestar partnership said the NFL "left $20 million
    on the table by not dealing with us."  The cable group will now
    push Primestar to their own customers who want DBS over cable.
    One cable exec of a Primestar partner: "It's much smarter to
    cannibalize ourselves and keep the business rather than let some
    other DBS supplier get it" (Chuck Ross, INSIDE MEDIA, 11/2
    issue).
    

    Print | Tags: NFL, Media
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